pershore wellbeing hub

Boundaries Policy

Date:12 12 22
Review: 01/24

 

Introduction

Pershore Wellbeing Hub has a commitment to keeping our volunteers and staff safe and sound in their roles at the Hub

This policy describes how we aim to do that.

This policy promotes a culture of compliance, honesty and ethical behaviour within Pershore Wellbeing Hub.

Scope

This policy applies to all Staff members and volunteers working for Pershore Wellbeing Hub.

This policy sets out the minimum requirements for Pershore Wellbeing Hub.

It is vital that everyone volunteering on behalf of Pershore Wellbeing Hub applies sound judgement so that, as they develop friendships with our visitors/clients, they represent the charity in a professional and trustworthy manner.

It’s also crucial that you understand the limits or boundaries of your specific role and manage expectations accordingly. After all, relationships can be complicated. Having a clear understanding of what is expected of you in your role – and what is not – will help ensure:

  • the protection and safety of yourself and the people you support
  • a safe and consistent setting in which relationships with others can develop.

 

 

Boundaries for Hub volunteers

 

Staff/ volunteers should:

  • understand the limits and expectations of their role
  • always act, and be seen to act, within the boundaries of their role
  • avoid any conduct which would lead any reasonable person to question their motivation and intentions
  • take responsibility for their own actions and behaviour

To facilitate this the Hub should:

  • have a clear role description: see volunteer agreement and induction training
  • ensure that systems are in place for concerns to be raised: see policies and procedures, eg grievance, safeguarding, whistleblowing policies
  • ensure that staff/volunteers are not placed in situations which could make them particularly vulnerable we continually review our policies and procedures, welcome feedback and constructive criticism, hold regular meetings where significant events can be learnt from (and minutes are circulated to all)

 

Boundaries

What is a boundary?

Boundaries are limits or rules to the relationship between the worker/ volunteer and person receiving the service from your group/ organisation.

Boundaries exist to protect both them and others.

A boundary is ‘the limit of what someone considers to be acceptable behaviour”.

Why are boundaries important?

Volunteering and working in your own community has great benefits. It can also be a challenge; so make sure you are clear on what you as a volunteer are expected to do as part of your volunteering role and what you are NOT to do as part of that role.

They cannot be all things to all people.

Boundaries mark the differences between personal and professional/ ‘volunteering’ roles and activities. Clear, effective boundaries balance a caring and supportive relationship with a person alongside appropriate professional distance.

Boundaries

  • Set expectations of behaviour for staff and volunteers
  • Provide way of supporting staff and volunteers so potentially compromising situations are avoided
  • Protect service users of your group from abuse or inappropriate behaviour from staff and volunteers
  • Reduce confusion for all parties
  • Allow you to stick to your role and not take on too much

Note: The volunteer agreement will help as it provides a clear explanation of what your role involves, what is expected of you and who you need to speak to if you need support!

 

 

 

What are some of the boundaries and safeguards we should use?

Do’s

  • Respect and maintain confidentiality*.

Keep any information you learn about those you help confidential, even after you leave.

*Do not confuse confidentiality with secrecy. If you have a safeguarding worry you cannot keep that a secret/confidential you must tell your safeguarding lead (see safeguarding and GDPR policies)

  • If the person tells you they are worried about something that is not related to your volunteering role ask what is worrying them and tell them that you will pass the information back to your group’s coordinator for support
  • If opening and closing the Hub make sure that you are not alone before the first visitor is admitted, and until all visitors have left. (Avoid lone working)
  • Do Carry ID badges. When you are wearing your badge you are there in a volunteering capacity.

Do nots

  • Do not give out your personal mobile number. If as a part of your volunteering role you have to call someone, call from the Hub phone, or from a withheld number. To withhold your number on individual calls dial 141 before the telephone number you want to call and it will show to the caller as ‘Private’
  • Do not give out your full name and address; if they do not already know you
  • Do not go into any person’s home, unless that is an explicitly agreed part of your role and you have clear guidance in place for this.
  • Do not be on your own with a service user, work in at least pairs.
  • Do not accept any gifts or money from people you are supporting
  • Do not ask someone to reveal their PIN number or give you their bank card – if fraud is committed on their bank account they are unlikely to get any refunds as they disclosed their PIN. You could also find yourself under suspicion.
  • sharing your personal details with the older person if this is not required as part of your
  • sharing the personal details of anyone connected to the Hub without
  • retaining or holding the keys of the older person’s home.
  • providing health care or health information for example, dispensing medication or advice.
  • providing personal care for example, help with eating/drinking or with washing.
  • managing money or handling cash on behalf of the visitor/client.
  • being involved in the conduct of the person’s affairs for example, acting as an advocate or as power of attorney.
  • accepting personal gifts from the older person.
  • offering counselling or therapy.
  • keeping secrets (as you may need to raise any safeguarding concerns).
  • Engaging in actions, including physical contact, language or opinions that are offensive or discriminatory.

 

Sayingnoand feeling OK

Saying ‘no’ to another person you have got to know can be difficult. If you are clear about your role, your boundaries, and organisational expectations you will be more confident in maintaining those boundaries as the relationship develops. You must consider that saying ‘yes’ on one occasion may mean you can’t say ‘no’ in future.

To manage these difficult situations, the following approach is recommended:

  • Explain why you have to say no (for example, it isHub rules).
  • Say you understand they may be upset at your
  • Give them the opportunity to explain how they
  • Stick to your decision and be firm and be consistent in your
  • Offer an alternative solution such as signposting to local organisation that can help.

 

 

Keeping the Hub in the loop

As a volunteer, it’s important that you let the Hub management or trustees know about any changes in your circumstances that might affect your voluntary role (for example, if you move house or if your phone number or email address change). Please let us know about any changes.

 

Complaints Policy

Date: 12 2022
Review: 01 24

 

Introduction

Pershore Wellbeing Hub strives for high standards in service delivery and welcomes feedback from individuals, users of our services, stakeholders, funding bodies and anyone who works with us, on all aspects of our services. Such feedback is invaluable in helping us evaluate and improve our work. We take complaints very seriously and views them as an opportunity to learn and improve for the future, as well as a chance to put things right for the person or organisation that has made the complaint.

The Hub

  • is committed to providing a good standard of quality services to service users, other agencies and organisations
  • will take seriously any concern or complaint and will look into it promptly, for resolution as quickly as possible
  • recognises that all service users, agencies and organisations
    -have the right to raise concerns or complaints about our services
    -have access to clear information on how to voice complaints and concerns
  • concerns and complaints procedure is open to everyone who receives or requests a service from Pershore Wellbeing Hub and people acting on their behalf
  • will produce a standard leaflet outlining this policy and procedure which should be on display and available to anyone who asks for it.
  • will deal with complaints in line with the Pershore Wellbeing Hub Confidentiality policy
  • will keep a register of all complaints, which will be reviewed regularly by the Board of Trustees
  • complaints procedure will be part of the process of monitoring the quality, effectiveness and non-discriminatory nature of its services
  • All staff, volunteers and Board of Trustees members are required to read, understand and comply with this policy and its procedures.

 

 

Scope

This policy applies to all Staff members, volunteers, contractors, consultants, secondees and trustees working for or with Pershore Wellbeing Hub.

This policy sets out the minimum requirements for Pershore Wellbeing Hub and aims to

  • Ensure everyone knows how to make a complaint and how a complaint will be handled
  • Ensure that complaints are dealt with consistently, fairly, and sensitively within clear time frames
  • Provide individuals with a fair and effective way to complain about our work
  • Ensure that complaints are monitored to improve our services

Policy

  • To ensure that there is a fair complaints procedure which is clear and easy to use for anyone wishing to make a complaint.
  • To publicise the existence of our complaints procedure so that people know how to contact us to make a complaint.
  • To make sure everyone at Pershore Wellbeing Hub knows what to do if a complaint is received.
  • To make sure all complaints are investigated fairly and in a timely way.
  • To make sure that complaints are, wherever possible, resolved and that relationships are repaired.
  • To gather information which helps us to improve what we do.

 

 

Definition of a Complaint

 

A complaint is any expression of dissatisfaction, whether justified or not, about any aspect of Pershore Wellbeing Hub.

Examples include where the Hub has:

  • Failed to provide a service or an acceptable standard of service or made a mistake in the way the service was provided
  • Failed to act in a proper way
  • Provided an unfair service

 

 

 

Where Complaints Come From

 

Complaints may come from any person or organisation who has a legitimate interest in Pershore Wellbeing Hub.

 

A complaint can be received by a number of routes, verbally, by phone, by email or in

writing, via the website or through social media.

 

This policy does not cover complaints from staff, who should use Pershore Wellbeing

Discipline and Grievance policies.

 

Concern or Complaint

It is important to establish the difference between a concern and a complaint. Taking informal concerns seriously at the earliest stage will reduce the likelihood of their developing into formal complaints.

If you have any concerns about our work please tell a staff worker or their manager as soon as possible, so they can quickly understand your concerns and try to put things right.

If you are not happy with the response to your concern and/or you want to make a formal complaint please follow the procedure below.

 

 

Complaints Procedure

Pershore Wellbeing Hub aims to settle the majority of complaints quickly and satisfactorily by the member of staff who provides the service. The complaint may be resolved quickly by way of an apology or by an acceptable explanation to the individual.

There are three stages to the complaint’s procedure:

  • Stage One – the complaint
  • Stage Two – investigation
  • Stage Three – appeal

Stage One – Complaint

The complaint can be written or if the individual prefers they can tell someone at Pershore Wellbeing Hub, or someone else, who will write it down for them. The complainant will need to sign it. A complaint form is available to use at appendix 1

Individuals wishing to make a complaint should contact the person who provided the service, or their line manager, or a trustee. Alternatively, they can contact us by writing to:

Pershore Wellbeing Hub

No. 4 High Street

Pershore

WR10 1BG

The complaint should include the complainants name and address, the nature and date of the complaint and how they want to see it resolved. The complaints form can be requested and can be sent to the complainant or collected by the complainant.

On receipt, each complaint will be allocated a reference number and logged on the complaints register. Complainants must receive an acknowledgement within 3 working days of receipt of a signed complaint.

Stage Two – Investigation

All complaints at this stage should be dealt with by an established volunteer or trustee. If they need to meet with the complainant, they will do so within seven working days of receiving the written complaint.

Complaints will be fully investigated, and a written response provided to the complainant within ten working days by the investigator.

The complainant will receive written confirmation of the outcome of any investigation any recommendations/remedies made, such as reviewing of policies, staff development and training or appropriate improvement to our services.

Where the complaint is upheld an apology should be offered.

Occasionally investigations may take longer, particularly if the complaint is complex. Should this be the case a holding letter will be sent after ten working days and a final date given for a conclusion to be reached.

If an individual remains dissatisfied with the outcome from Stage Two they can appeal within fourteen working days of the date of the outcome and progress to Stage Three.

The complaints register will be updated, and any pending complaints flagged so they are followed up.

Stage Three – Appeal

If the complaint cannot be resolved to the complainants satisfaction at stage two, or if the manager feels that the complaint is of a very serious nature, or concerns a service leader then it will be referred to the Chair of the Trustee Board.

If the complaint is about the Chair of the Trustee Board then the matter will be discussed with two independent Trustees.

The Chair of the Trustee Board and/or Trustees will acknowledge receipt within three working days, they will review the Stage Two investigation and recommend one of the following actions within ten working days (from the date the complainant stated they wanted to take the complaint to stage 3):

  • Uphold the action taken at Stage Two
  • Make changes to the Stage Two recommendation/actions

The complainant should be informed in writing of the outcome of stage three, the decision reached about this complaint will then be final but other options available to the complainant (as listed below) should be detailed in the letter.

If after Pershore Wellbeing Hub has been through the three stages and the complainant is still not satisfied with the result, they should be advised that there is no further right of appeal with Pershore Wellbeing Hub but they could approach any of the following agencies for advice:

  • A solicitor
  • Citizens Advice Bureau

This should be done within one month of receiving the outcome from the appeal.

Anonymous complaints

Complaints received anonymously will be recorded and considered, but action may be limited if further information is required to ensure a full and fair investigation.

Data protection

To process a complaint Pershore Wellbeing Hub will hold personal data about the complainant, which the individual provides, and which other people give in response to the complaint. We will hold this data securely and only use it to address the complaint. The identity of the person making the complaint will only be known to those who need to consider the complaint and will not be revealed to other people or made public. However, it may not be possible to preserve confidentiality in some circumstances, for example, where relevant legislation applied or allegations are made which involve the conduct of third parties.

Pershore Wellbeing Hub will normally destroy complaints files in a secure manner six years after the complaint has been closed.

Monitoring

Complaints are an important tool which, alongside data provided by exit surveys, stakeholder surveys, user feedback and focus groups, will allow us to learn about the services we provide. They provide a useful source of information about how individuals see our services and how we are serving them. To ensure we can learn from complaints the following data will be collected:

  • Name and address
  • Name of person dealing with the complaint
  • Date of complaint and response
  • Nature of complaint
  • Action(s) taken/recommendations made in response to the complaint Lessons learnt

Complaints information will be considered on a regular basis by the Management Team and reported annually to Pershore Wellbeing Hub board of Trustees. Wherever possible the data will be used to improve and develop the service.

COMPLAINTS POLICY Responsibility

 

Overall responsibility for this policy and its implementation lies with the Trustees.

 

Confidentiality Policy

Date: 12 22
Review: 01 24

 

Introduction

Pershore Wellbeing Hub has a commitment to work within the law and to maintain confidentiality. For our Clients and visitors trust is important and therefore they need to be reassured that we will not divulge any information that we learn from our contacts with them.

This principle also applies to any information that Pershore Wellbeing Hub comes into possession of, relating to contractors, staff, volunteers and trustees.

Scope

This policy applies to all Staff members, contractors, consultants, secondees and volunteers working for or with Pershore Wellbeing Hub.

This policy sets out the minimum requirements for Pershore Wellbeing Hub.

 

 

 

Confidentiality Policy

To function effectively Pershore Wellbeing Hub may, from time to time, hold personal data about a visitor or client, which the individual provides, and which other parties contribute to, in order to help fulfil the request for help from the visitor or user.

We will hold this data securely and only use it to address the issues raised by the visitor or client. This information will only be known to those who need to in order to assist the visitor or client,  and will not be revealed to other people or made public.

Pershore Wellbeing Hub provides practical guidance, information and support to the community of Pershore and surrounding villages.

Care and guidance is given free by Volunteers who work alongside other professional carers to ensure a wide range of confidential advice and support is offered to residents.

The principles of Confidentiality are set out below and all volunteers, are required to adhere to these principles by signing this Code of Practice.

 

Main Principles:

 

  1. Information given by a client to enable you to help them is information that ‘belongs’ to Pershore Wellbeing Hub. As such you may discuss that information with your colleagues, Wellbeing Hub Manager and Chair of Trustees if necessary.
  2. You may also pass on this information to other agencies in your quest in obtaining help for your client. However, you must have your client’s permission to do this.
  3. You may not discuss information given by a client to third parties including other members of the family unless directly involved in obtaining help and support unless you have your client’s permission to do this.
  4. Confidential files must be kept under lock and key. Files must not be left on view in the offices where they can be accessed by those unauthorised to do so. Confidential files must remain in the Centre at all times.
  5. IT containing client information should be locked or shut down when left unmanned.
  6. Confidential Information both hard and soft copy must be reviewed regularly. Where there is no expectation that items of such information will be of use in the work of Pershore Wellbeing Hub in the future, then this information should be destroyed.
  7. Volunteers are to operate a “clear desk” regime whenever they are absent for more than a few minutes.
  8. The telephone numbers and addresses of clients are not to be disclosed to third parties.

10.You are to avoid discussion of sensitive welfare information especially in situations where there is a possibility of being overheard.

 

Confidentiality limits

Confidentiality is often misunderstood and although it is vital to engender trust, it also has its limits.

It is most unusual to break confidence, and when it is broken it can have significant effects upon the foundations of that relationship. So, any breach must be carefully considered. Potential reasons are:

  • Pershore Wellbeing Hub’s duty of care towards the visitor or client takes higher priority, should they be in mental or physical danger
  • Pershore Wellbeing Hub also has higher responsibilities in the context of duties in law (e.g. avoiding complicity in crime)

 

It can be argued that privacy may be a more appropriate term but should be confined to the content of the discussions and not the relationship per se. If confidentiality should be broken it should discussed first, so that both parties know how and why the confidence is being breached, what duties of care exist, and who should make that breach. Often guidance from a professional body is useful.

 

Other than above any breach of confidentiality by volunteers will be treated as a disciplinary matter.

 

Disciplinary Policy & Procedure

Date: 12 2022
Review: 01 2024

 

Introduction

Pershore Wellbeing Hub has a commitment to promote mutual respect and trust between the trustee board and its staff, volunteers and users. We wish to demonstrate through this policy that that we value every individual but recognise that there are situations that occur from time to time where the Hub’s expectations regarding conduct and performance are not met by a member of staff or volunteer.  When the these situations arise they will be treated as per this disciplinary policy, sensitively and appropriately.

Pershore Wellbeing Hub’s aim is to deal with any areas of conflict sensitively, appropriately, safeguarding the good name of the Hub, and at all times within the law.

Scope

This policy applies to all Staff members and volunteers working for or with Pershore Wellbeing Hub.

This policy sets out the minimum requirements for Pershore Wellbeing Hub.

A disciplinary procedure is a formal way for an employer to deal with an employee’s or volunteer’s:

  • unacceptable or improper behaviour (‘misconduct’)
  • performance (‘capability’)

 

 

 

Disciplinary Policy & Procedure

 

 

A disciplinary procedure is a formal way for the Hub to deal with an employee’s, or volunteer’s:

  • unacceptable or improper behaviour (‘misconduct’)
  • performance (‘capability’)

 

Before starting a disciplinary procedure, the Hub will first see whether the problem can be resolved in an informal way. This can often be the quickest and easiest solution.

The Hub will try solving the issue with their employee or volunteer by:

  • privately talking with them and any other staff involved
  • listening to their point of view
  • agreeing improvements to be made
  • setting up a training or development plan if it’s a performance issue.

 

 

Dealing with capability issues

Capability or performance is about an employee’s or volunteer’s ability to do the job or role.

As a consistent approach the Hub will first attempt to deal with such issues through:

  • support
  • training
  • encouragement to improve

Whether the Hub deals with the issue under a capability or disciplinary procedure, the Hub will endeavour to do so fairly.

 

 

 

What counts as misconduct

Misconduct is when an employee’s or volunteer’s inappropriate behaviour or action breaks workplace rules.

Some misconduct examples include:

  • bullying
  • harassment
  • refusing to do work (‘insubordination’)
  • being absent without permission(some people call it absent without leave or ‘AWOL’)

But your workplace might have its own examples.

 

If misconduct happens outside the workplace

An employee or volunteer could face disciplinary action for misconduct outside work.

For example, where an employee’s or volunteer’s behaviour in front of external clients at the work Christmas party reflects badly on the Hub.

The Hub will form an opinion on the misconduct and whether it could have a bad effect on the charity.

The Hub will carry out a thorough investigation and can show the effect on the charity.

 

When there is gross misconduct

Some acts count as ‘gross misconduct’ because they are very serious or have very serious effects.

If the Hub finds there has been gross misconduct, the Hub will still carry out an investigation and the full disciplinary procedure. The Hub might then decide on dismissal without notice or payment in lieu of notice.

Examples of gross misconduct in the workplace could include:

  • fraud
  • physical violence
  • serious lack of care to their duties or other people (‘gross negligence’)
  • serious insubordination, for example refusing to take lawful and reasonable orders from a supervisor

 

 

Disciplinary Procedure

 

 

The Hub will first consider trying to resolve the issue informally but may feel that the charity needs to start a disciplinary procedure. In this case the Hub will tell the employee or volunteer straight away.

This will be done in writing and will include:

  • sufficient information about the alleged misconduct or poor performance
  • possible consequences, for example a written warning

The employee or volunteer should have this information in time to prepare for a disciplinary meeting.

The Hub will make sure that they follow a full and fair procedure throughout.

This is for the protection of the employee, the Hub trustees and the charity.

As a minimum the Hub will follow ACAS guidelines which can be found at

www.acas.org.uk/acas-code-of-practice-on-disciplinary-and-grievance-procedures

 

Prior precedents

The Hub will check whether it has dealt with a similar situation before.

To avoid accusations of unfair treatment, the Hub will follow the procedure and policy in the same way for each disciplinary case.

The Hub will gather evidence and make a decision based on what they know about each case.

 

Keep talking

It’s important throughout the procedure for the Hub to keep talking with both the employee or volunteer being disciplined and any other staff affected. We will endeavour to do this.

Clear, regular, and confidential communication will help avoid:

  • misunderstandings
  • a drop in work morale
  • stress or other mental health issues
  • further action, for example the employee or volunteer raising a grievance
  • legal action further down the line

 

 

The Hub will keep all personal information confidential.

 

 

Looking after employees’ wellbeing and mental health

The Hub recognises that going through a disciplinary procedure can be very stressful, so we will consider the wellbeing and mental health of their employee or volunteer.

Looking out for the employee’s or volunteer’s wellbeing and offering support is an attempt to prevent:

  • absence
  • mental health issues arising
  • existing mental health issues getting worse

For example, as well as regular communication, the Hub may offer to arrange any meetings in a more private and comfortable location if this would help the employee or volunteer.

 

If the employee raises a grievance

If the employee or volunteer raises a grievance during the disciplinary procedure, the Hub can pause the disciplinary and deal with the grievance first. However, it might be appropriate to deal with both at the same time if the grievance and disciplinary cases are related.

 

If the employee wants to resign

The employee or volunteer might feel they want to resign or ‘jump before they’re pushed’ when they are facing a disciplinary.

This could risk the employee later claiming ‘constructive dismissal‘ at an employment tribunal. They can only do this if they have worked for the organisation for 2 years or more.

The Hub will try and talk through any concerns with the employee or volunteer and encourage them to complete the disciplinary procedure first.

 

 

Investigation

 

It is important to carry out necessary investigations of potential disciplinary matters without unreasonable delay to establish the facts of the case. In some cases this will require the holding of an investigatory meeting with the employee or volunteer before proceeding to any disciplinary hearing. In others, the investigatory stage will be the collation of evidence by the Hub for use at any disciplinary hearing.

In misconduct cases, where practicable, different people representing the Hub should carry out the investigation and disciplinary hearing.

If there is an investigatory meeting this should not by itself result in any disciplinary action. Although there is no statutory right for an employee to be accompanied at a formal investigatory meeting, such a right will be extended to any employee or volunteer by the Hub as the Hub values openness and transparency as well as the mental wellbeing of all staff.

In cases where a period of suspension (with pay if appropriate) is considered necessary, this period should be as brief as possible, should be kept under review and it should be made clear that this suspension is not considered a disciplinary action in itself.

 

Communication with Employee or Volunteer

If it is decided that there is a disciplinary case to answer, the employee or volunteer will be notified of this in writing. This notification will contain sufficient information about the alleged misconduct or poor performance and its possible consequences to enable the employee or volunteer to prepare to answer the case at a disciplinary meeting. It would normally be appropriate to provide copies of any written evidence, which may include any witness statements, with the notification.

The notification should also give details of the time and venue for the disciplinary meeting and advise the employee or volunteer of their right to be accompanied at the meeting.

 

Disciplinary meeting with the employee to discuss the problem.

The disciplinary meeting will be held without unreasonable delay whilst allowing the employee or volunteer reasonable time to prepare their case. It is the interests of both parties to proceed in a timely manner, without undue haste.

The Hub and employees/volunteers (and their companions) should make every effort to attend the meeting. At the meeting the Hub will explain the complaint against the employee/volunteer and go through the evidence that has been gathered. The employee/volunteer will be allowed to set out their case and answer any allegations that have been made. The employee/volunteer will also be given a reasonable opportunity to ask questions, present evidence and call relevant witnesses. They will also be given an opportunity to raise points about any information provided by witnesses. Where the Hub or employee/volunteer intends to call relevant witnesses they should give advance notice that they intend to do this.

 

The employee/volunteer can be accompanied at the meeting: the statutory right in employment situations is to be accompanied by a fellow worker, a trade union representative, or an official employed by a trade union. The Hub extends this right to volunteers. Such a request to be accompanied should be reasonable and timely enough to allow the Hub to comply. Such a request does not need to be in writing.

If an employee’s/volunteer’s chosen companion will not be available at the time proposed for the hearing by the Hub, the Hub must postpone the hearing to a time proposed by the employee/volunteer provided that the alternative time is both reasonable and not more than five working days after the date originally proposed. The companion should be allowed to address the hearing to put and sum up the employee/volunteer case, respond on their behalf to any views expressed at the meeting and confer with them during the hearing. The companion does not, however, have the right to answer questions on the employee’s/volunteer’s behalf, address the hearing if the employee/volunteer does not wish it, or prevent the Hub from explaining their case.

The meeting can be adjourned for any further investigation that may be necessary.

 

 

 

Appropriate Action

After the meeting the Hub will decide whether or not disciplinary or any other action is justified and inform the employee/volunteer accordingly in writing.

Where misconduct is confirmed or the employee/volunteer is found to be performing unsatisfactorily it is usual for the Hub to give the employee/volunteer a written warning. A further act of misconduct or failure to improve performance within a set period would normally result in a final written warning.

If an employee’s first misconduct or unsatisfactory performance is sufficiently serious, it may be appropriate to move directly to a final written warning. This might occur where the employee’s/volunteer’s actions have had, or are liable to have, a serious or harmful impact on the Hub as an organisation.

A first or final written warning will set out the nature of the misconduct or poor performance and the change in behaviour or improvement in performance required (with appropriate timescales). The employee/volunteer will be told how long the warning will remain current. The employee/volunteer will be informed of the consequences of further misconduct, or failure to improve performance, within the set period following a final warning. For instance, that it may result in dismissal or some other contractual penalty such as demotion or loss of seniority.

A decision to dismiss should only be taken by a manager who has the authority to do so, as delegated by the Trustee Board of the Hub. The employee/volunteer will be informed as soon as possible of the reasons for the dismissal, the date on which the employment contract will end, the appropriate period of notice and their right of appeal.

Some acts, termed gross misconduct, are so serious in themselves or have such serious consequences that they may call for dismissal without notice for a first offence. But a fair disciplinary process will always be followed, before dismissing for gross misconduct. (Examples of acts which the Hub regards as acts of gross misconduct are noted above.)

Where an employee is persistently unable or unwilling to attend a disciplinary meeting without good cause the Hub will make a decision on the evidence available to it.

 

 

Appeal Process

As with all things errors can occur, and the Hub accepts that even a careful process, correctly caried out can contain errors, or that relevant evidence may become apparent after any decisions have been taken. Accordingly, the Hub has an appeals process as part of the disciplinary framework.

Where an employee/volunteer feels that disciplinary action taken against them is wrong or unjust they should appeal against the decision. Appeals will be heard without unreasonable delay and ideally at an agreed time and place. Employees/volunteers should let the Hub know the grounds for their appeal in writing.

The appeal should be dealt with impartially and, wherever possible, by at least 2 trustees of the Hub who have not previously been involved in the case.

Employees/Volunteers have a statutory right to be accompanied at appeal hearings. (details as set out above as per the disciplinary meeting.)

Employees/volunteers will be informed in writing of the results of the appeal hearing as soon as possible.

 

Special cases

Where disciplinary action is being considered against an employee who is a trade union representative the normal disciplinary procedure will still be followed. Depending on the circumstances, however the Hub may discuss the matter at an early stage with an official employed by the union, after obtaining the employee’s/volunteer’s agreement.

If an employee/volunteer is charged with, or convicted of a criminal offence this is not normally in itself reason for disciplinary action. Consideration needs to be given to what effect the charge or conviction has on the employee’s/volunteer’s suitability to do the job and their relationship with their employer, work colleagues and customers.

 

Equality Diversity & Inclusion Policy

Date: 12 2022
Review: 01 2024

 

1       Introduction

Pershore Wellbeing Hub has a commitment to promote equality and diversity within our charity and its users in areas such as recruitment of volunteers, training and the environment of our premises. We wish to demonstrate that we value every individual and will support them to combat discrimination or harassment.

It is recommended that PWH adopts an Equality, Diversity and Inclusion policy. The Charity Commission in England and Wales enquires as to the existence of this policy within the annual return questionnaire.

Pershore Wellbeing Hub aims to safeguard those who feel discriminated against. We wish to protect those who may face inequality or harassment due to one or more of the nine protected characteristics set out in the Equality Act of 2010 (see Note 2)

Age

Disability (see Note 1)

Sex

Sexual orientation

Race

Religion and Belief

Gender re-assignment

Marriage and Civil Partnership

Pregnancy and Matrimony

 

All volunteers will be treated fairly and with respect.

All volunteers taking on additional management roles will be given help and encouragement through training opportunities for those specific roles where appropriate

2       Pershore Wellbeing Hub commitments:

  • To create an environment in which the individual differences and the contribution of all members of the PWH are recognised and valued.
  • To create a working environment that promotes dignity and respect for all.
  • To not tolerate any form of intimidation or harassment to volunteers, or other users by clients of PWH.
  • To make training and development opportunities available to all staff.
  • To encourage anyone who feels they have been subject to discrimination to raise their concerns.
  • To encourage our volunteers and other users to treat everyone with dignity and respect.
  • To inform all volunteers and other users that an Equality and Diversity Policy is in place.
  • To aim for the PWH to truly representative of all sections of society (Diversity aim).

3       Practical Considerations

The Hub will make sure all new members are aware of our policies and procedures in relation to equality, diversity and inclusion and accessibility as well as the Member Code of Conduct. The Hub will make reasonable adjustments and take practical steps to ensure a wide range of people can participate in our activities and meetings. This may include:

  • Consideration given to the time of day of meetings and their location.
  • Consideration of venues for meetings including:
  • Accessible to wheelchair users
  • Access to PA system and a hearing loop
  • Parking and disabled parking available
  • Disabled toilet facilities available

 

  • Publicity:
  • Using a variety of methods and platforms to communicate externally and raise the profile of the Hub.
  • Make communications available to those who don’t have access to the internet
  • Use a range of images that reflect the local community

 

  • Recruiting new volunteers:
  • Encouraging volunteers who are representative of the groups who are underrepresented within the Hub i.e. men or younger members to assist with the recruitment process
  • Managing growth so that we ensure that new volunteers can be accommodated

 

  • Monitoring:
  • The Hub will monitor volunteer numbers i.e. the numbers of volunteers who join, re-join and leave each year in order to identify any trend.
  • The Hub committee will review the diversity of the volunteers on an ongoing basis and will seek to ensure that the Hub remains attractive and accessible to all.
  • Tasks and Roles:
  • Ensure a range of people get their voices heard by encouraging more volunteers to take on roles such as leading groups or initiatives.
  • The Hub will appoint an Accessibility Officer whose role it will be to ensure that both new and existing volunteers can access any meetings and groups that they would like to and consider what reasonable adjustments may be needed to ensure this.
  • The Hub will offer induction and training around equality, diversity and inclusion to Committee Members and staff on an ongoing basis.

 

4       Code of Conduct

The Hub has a member code of conduct. The code of conduct outlines that volunteers and staff should abide by the Hub’s policies and procedures as well as treating each other with dignity and respect. This would include not acting in a way that would be deemed discriminatory or offensive.

 

5       Dealing with Discrimination & harassment

Where the Hub trustees become aware of any discriminatory practice or harassment, the trustees will seek to address this through consultation with all parties concerned and, where necessary, through invoking formal procedures.

If any volunteer or staff member of the Hub feel that they have experienced or witnessed discriminatory behaviour or harassment, this should be reported to the Trustee board. Any matters of concern will be reviewed by the Trustees and a decision will be made, in line with the Hub’s constitution and formal procedures, as to what steps will be taken to address the issue.

 

6       Definitions

Equality is about ensuring that every individual has an equal opportunity to make the most of their lives and talents and believing that no one should have poorer life chances because of where, when or whom they were born, or because of other characteristics. Promoting equality is about behaving in a way that tackles inequalities, aiming to ensure that all members are treated fairly, and do not experience discrimination.

Promoting diversity is about recognising that everyone is different and creating an environment that values members and ensuring that the Hub is as accessible as possible to different groups within the community.

Inclusion is about positively striving to meet the needs of different people and taking practical steps to ensure members feel respected.

Direct Discrimination is when a person is treated less favourably because of their ethnic origin, nationality (or statelessness) or race, age, disability, religion or belief (including the absence of belief), marital or civil partnership status, sexual orientation, pregnancy, gender reassignment, political belief

Indirect Discrimination occurs when a condition or requirement is applied equally to all groups of people but has a disproportionately adverse effect on one particular group.

Harassment is unwanted conduct related to ‘protected characteristics’ that has the purpose or effect of violating a volunteer’s, or staff member’s, dignity, or creating an intimidating, hostile, degrading, humiliating or offensive environment. Harassment is also unwanted conduct of a sexual nature which has that same purpose or effect.

Victimisation occurs when a volunteer or staff member is treated less favourably than others in the same circumstances because he or she has made a complaint or an allegation of discrimination, harassment or bullying or given information regarding such a complaint or allegation.

 

7       In summary:

We will try to eliminate unlawful discrimination, advance equality of opportunity, and we will not tolerate any form of harassment or intimidation.

We will foster good relations between people who share a protected characteristic and those who do not.

We will ensure that Equality training is part of our induction programmes.

 

4       Monitoring

Gill Perks responsible for the effective implementation and monitoring of this policy

Raising a complaint should be addressed to gill@pershorewellbeinghub.co.uk

 

 

Sources: High Speed Learning, NCVO HRS ( Human Resources Solutions) Pershore TC

————————————————————————————————————————————-

For trustees:

Note 1 : Disability is another complex area. The nature of disability is defined and also what steps should be taken to accommodate disability. I understand this should be ‘reasonable’ and I guess that it would be unreasonable(eg) to undertake extensive remodelling of our premises – but the Trustees should research this should a case arise –see NCVO detailed advice. Disabled people should be included in training programmes; reasonable adaptations for a volunteer who becomes disabled etc.

 

 

Note 2: This is a complex area but it seems that the Equality Act does not apply to volunteers because they do not have a contract or receive a salary which would class a person as an employee. They do not have exactly the same rights as an employee but of course the aim and advice should be that they will be treated in exactly the spirit of the Equalities Act  – reflected in our document)

 

 

GDPR Policy

Date: 12 22
Review: 01 24

 

Introduction

Pershore Wellbeing Hub has a commitment to protecting the privacy and security of your personal information.

This privacy notice describes how we collect and use personal information about staff, volunteers, Hub visitors, clients and contractors during and after these working relationship with us, in accordance with the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR).

 

This policy promotes a culture of compliance, honesty and ethical behaviour within Pershore Wellbeing Hub.

Scope

This policy applies to all Staff members, contractors, consultants, secondees and volunteers working for or with Pershore Wellbeing Hub.

This policy sets out the minimum requirements for Pershore Wellbeing Hub.

Pershore Wellbeing Hub is a “data controller“. This means that we are responsible for deciding how we hold and use personal information about people. We are required under data protection legislation to notify people of the information contained in this privacy notice.

This notice applies to current and former volunteers. This notice does not form part of any contract of employment or other contract to provide services. We may update this notice at any time.

It is important that you read this notice, together with any other privacy notice we may provide on specific occasions when we are collecting or processing personal information about you, so that you are aware of how and why we are using such information.

Volunteer and Employee Section

 

Data protection principles

In principle this is the same as per other groups of people that the Hub comes into contact with, but for ease of purpose and interpretation this document contains 2 separate sections.

 

We will comply with data protection law. This says that the personal information we hold about you must be:

  1. Used lawfully, fairly and in a transparent way.
  2. Collected only for valid purposes that we have clearly explained to you and not used in any way that is incompatible with those purposes.
  3. Relevant to the purposes we have told you about and limited only to those purposes.
  4. Accurate and kept up to date.
  5. Kept only as long as necessary for the purposes we have told you about.
  6. Kept securely.

 

The kind of information we hold about you

Personal data, or personal information, means any information about an individual from which that person can be identified. It does not include data where the identity has been removed (anonymous data).

There are “special categories” of more sensitive personal data which require a higher level of protection.

We may collect, store, and use the following categories of personal information about you:

  • Personal contact details such as name, title, addresses, telephone numbers, and personal email addresses.
  • Date of birth.
  • Gender.
  • Marital status and dependants.
  • Next of kin and emergency contact information.
  • Bank account details
  • Start date.
  • Location of workplace.
  • Copy of driving licence.
  • Recruitment information (including references and other information included in a CV or cover letter or as part of the application process.
  • Volunteer records (including role titles, work history, training records and professional memberships).
  • Information about your use of our information and communications systems.
  • Photographs.

 

We may also collect, store and use the following “special categories” of more sensitive personal information:

  • Information about your health, including any medical condition, health and sickness records.
  • Information about criminal convictions and offences.

 

How is your personal information collected?

We typically collect personal information about volunteers through the application and recruitment process, either directly from candidates or sometimes from an employment agency or background check provider. We may sometimes collect additional information from third parties including former employers or other background check agencies, inc. DBS and PVG Scheme Membership.

We will collect additional personal information in the course of volunteer related activities throughout the period of you volunteering with us.

 

How we will use information about you:

We will only use your personal information when the law allows us to. Most commonly, we will use your personal information in the following circumstances:

  1. Where we need to perform the agreement (employment contract/volunteer agreement) we have entered into with you.
  2. Where we need to comply with a legal obligation.
  3. Where it is necessary for our legitimate interests (or those of a third party) and your interests and fundamental rights do not override those interests.
  4. Where you are a significant member of a team that we need to introduce to a customer or other third party.

We may also use your personal information in the following situations, which are likely to be rare:

  1. Where we need to protect your interests (or someone else’s interests).
  2. Where it is needed in the public interest or for official purposes.

 

Situations in which we will use your personal information

We need all the categories of information in the list above (see The kind of information we hold about you) primarily to allow us to perform our agreement with you and to enable us to comply with legal obligations. In some cases we may use your personal information to pursue legitimate interests of our own or those of third parties, provided your interests and fundamental rights do not override those interests. The situations in which we will process your personal information are listed below.

  • Making a decision about your recruitment or appointment.
  • Determining the terms on which you volunteer with us.
  • Administering the agreement we have entered into with you.
  • Business management and planning, including accounting, marketing and auditing.
  • Assessing qualifications for a particular role or task.
  • Making decisions about our continued relationship.
  • Making arrangements for the termination of our relationship.
  • Education, training, and development requirements.
  • Dealing with legal disputes involving you, or employees, workers and contractors, including accidents at work.
  • Ascertaining your fitness to volunteer/work.
  • Complying with health and safety obligations.
  • To prevent fraud.
  • To ensure network and information security, including preventing unauthorised access to our computer and electronic communications systems and preventing malicious software distribution.
  • Equal opportunities monitoring.

 

Some of the above grounds for processing will overlap and there may be several grounds which justify our use of your personal information.

 

If you fail to provide personal information

If you fail to provide certain information when requested, we may not be able to perform the contract we have entered into with you (such as allowing you to volunteer at the Hub, or paying you expenses), or we may be prevented from complying with our legal obligations (such as to ensure the health and safety of our workers).

 

Change of purpose

We will only use your personal information for the purposes for which we collected it, unless we reasonably consider that we need to use it for another reason and that reason is compatible with the original purpose. If we need to use your personal information for an unrelated purpose, we will notify you and we will explain the legal basis which allows us to do so. Please note that we may process your personal information without your knowledge or consent, in compliance with the above rules, where this is required or permitted by law.

 

How we use particularly sensitive personal information

“Special categories” of particularly sensitive personal information require higher levels of protection.

We need to have further justification for collecting, storing and using this type of personal information.

We may process special categories of personal information in the following circumstances:

  1. In limited circumstances, with your explicit written consent.
  2. Where we need to carry out our legal obligations and in line with our privacy standard.
  3. Where it is needed in the public interest, such as for equal opportunities monitoring or in relation to our occupational pension scheme, and in line with our privacy standard.
  4. Where it is needed to assess your working capacity on health grounds, subject to appropriate confidentiality safeguards.

Less commonly, we may process this type of information where it is needed in relation to legal claims or where it is needed to protect your interests (or someone else’s interests) and you are not capable of giving your consent, or where you have already made the information public. We may also process such information about members or former members in the course of legitimate business activities with the appropriate safeguards.

 

Our obligations as an organisation engaging volunteers

We will use your particularly sensitive personal information about your physical or mental health, or disability status, to ensure your health and safety in the workplace and to assess your fitness to volunteer, to provide appropriate workplace adjustments.

Do we need your consent?

We do not need your consent if we use special categories of your personal information in accordance with our written policy to carry out our legal obligations or exercise specific rights in the field of employment law. In limited circumstances, we may approach you for your written consent to allow us to process certain particularly sensitive data. If we do so, we will provide you with full details of the information that we would like and the reason we need it, so that you can carefully consider whether you wish to consent. You should be aware that it is not a condition of your agreement with us that you agree to any request for consent from us.

 

Information about criminal convictions

We may only use information relating to criminal convictions where the law allows us to do so. This will usually be where such processing is necessary to carry out our obligations and provided we do so in line with our privacy standard.

Less commonly, we may use information relating to criminal convictions where it is necessary in relation to legal claims, where it is necessary to protect your interests (or someone else’s interests) and you are not capable of giving your consent, or where you have already made the information public.

We may also process such information about members or former members in the course of legitimate business activities with the appropriate safeguards.

We envisage that we will hold information about criminal convictions.

We will only collect information about criminal convictions if it is appropriate given the nature of the role at the Hub and where we are legally able to do so. Where appropriate, we will collect information about criminal convictions as part of the recruitment process or where we need that information because of your role. We may be notified of such information directly by you in the course of you working for us.

We are allowed to use your personal information in this way to carry out our obligations.

 

Data sharing

We may have to share your data with third parties, including customers, third-party service providers.

We require third parties to respect the security of your data and to treat it in accordance with the law.

We may transfer your personal information outside the EU for any of the purposes described in this notice.

If we do, you can expect a similar degree of protection in respect of your personal information.

Why might we share your personal information with third parties?

We may share your personal information with third parties where required by law, where it is necessary to administer the working relationship with you or where we have another legitimate interest in doing so.

Which third-party service providers process your personal information?

“Third parties” includes third-party service providers (including contractors and designated agents). The following activities are carried out by third-party service providers: IT services and our CRM database provider.

How secure is your information with third-party service providers?

All our third-party service providers and other entities in the group are required to take appropriate security measures to protect your personal information under the general law or in line with our policies. We do not allow our third-party service providers to use your personal data for their own purposes. We only permit them to process your personal data for specified purposes and in accordance with our instructions.

What about other third parties?

We may share your personal information with other third parties, for example in the context of the possible sale or restructuring of the organisation. We may also need to share your personal information with a regulator or to otherwise comply with the law.

 

Data retention

How long will you use my information for?

We will only retain your personal information for as long as necessary to fulfil the purposes we collected it for, including for the purposes of satisfying any legal, accounting, or reporting requirements.

To determine the appropriate retention period for personal data, we consider the amount, nature, and sensitivity of the personal data, the potential risk of harm from unauthorised use or disclosure of your personal data, the purposes for which we process your personal data and whether we can achieve those purposes through other means, and the applicable legal requirements.

In some circumstances we may anonymise your personal information so that it can no longer be associated with you, in which case we may use such information without further notice to you. Once you are no longer a volunteer of the company we will retain and securely destroy your personal information in accordance with applicable laws and regulations.

 

Rights of access, correction, erasure, and restriction

Your duty to inform us of changes

It is important that the personal information we hold about you is accurate and current. Please keep us informed if your personal information changes during your volunteering relationship with us.

Your rights in connection with personal information

Under certain circumstances, by law you have the right to:

  • Request access to your personal information (commonly known as a “data subject access request”). This enables you to receive a copy of the personal information we hold about you and to check that we are lawfully processing it.
  • Request correction of the personal information that we hold about you. This enables you to have any incomplete or inaccurate information we hold about you corrected.
  • Request erasure of your personal information. This enables you to ask us to delete or remove personal information where there is no good reason for us continuing to process it. You also have the right to ask us to delete or remove your personal information where you have exercised your right to object to processing (see below).
  • Object to processing of your personal information where we are relying on a legitimate interest (or those of a third party) and there is something about your particular situation which makes you want to object to processing on this ground. You also have the right to object where we are processing your personal information for direct marketing purposes.
  • Request the restriction of processing of your personal information. This enables you to ask us to suspend the processing of personal information about you, for example if you want us to establish its accuracy or the reason for processing it.

 

If you want to review, verify, correct or request erasure of your personal information, or object to the processing of your personal data, or request that we transfer a copy of your personal information to another party, please contact the Data Protection Officer in writing (details below)

No fee usually required

You will not have to pay a fee to access your personal information (or to exercise any of the other rights). However, we may charge a reasonable fee if your request for access is clearly unfounded or excessive. Alternatively, we may refuse to comply with the request in such circumstances.

What we may need from you

We may need to request specific information from you to help us confirm your identity and ensure your right to access the information (or to exercise any of your other rights).

This is another appropriate security measure to ensure that personal information is not disclosed to any person who has no right to receive it.

Right to withdraw consent

In the limited circumstances where you may have provided your consent to the collection, processing and transfer of your personal information for a specific purpose, you have the right to withdraw your consent for that specific processing at any time. To withdraw your consent, please contact the Data Protection Officer (details below). Once we have received notification that you have withdrawn your consent, we will no longer process your information for the purpose or purposes you originally agreed to, unless we have another legitimate basis for doing so in law.

 

Data protection officer

We have appointed a data protection officer (DPO) to oversee compliance with this privacy notice. If you have any questions about this privacy notice or how we handle your personal information, please contact the DPO. You have the right to make a complaint at any time to the Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO), the UK supervisory authority for data protection issues.

Changes to this privacy notice

We reserve the right to update this privacy notice at any time, and we will provide you with a new privacy notice when we make any substantial updates. We may also notify you in other ways from time to time about the processing of your personal information.

If you have any questions about this privacy notice, please contact the Data Protection Officer:

Dr Chris Perks         info@pershorewellbeinghub.co.uk

 

 

 

 

 

Hub Visitors Section

 

In principle this is the same as per volunteers and staff member at the Hub but for ease of purpose and interpretation this document contains 2 separate sections.

 

As a matter of principle we try avoid taking or retaining any information about Hub users, clients, or visitors if at all possible. Where we do so it is usually data that is given to us freely by someone to allow us to help them. We will only retain information for as long as needed to allow us to perform that role of assistance. Once that role is completed we will destroy such data.

 

At Pershore Wellbeing Hub, we’re committed to protecting and respecting your privacy.

This policy explains when and why we collect personal information about you, how we use it, the conditions under which we may disclose it to others, how we keep it safe and secure and your rights and choices in relation to your information.

Any questions regarding this policy and our privacy practices should be sent by email info@pershorewllbeinghub.co.uk

 

Who it applies to

This policy applies to individuals whose personal data is processed by Pershore Wellbeing Hub. Charity no. 1192944

More information can be found at the Charities Commision:

https://register-of-charities.charitycommission.gov.uk/charity-search/-/charity-details/5172418

 

 

How do we collect information from you?

We obtain information about you in the following ways:

Information you give us directly

For example, we may obtain information about you when you take part in one of our events, make a donation, apply to volunteer for us, call our Advice Line.

Mandatory information

In some circumstances, it may be mandatory to collect and process some of your personal details to deliver the service or provide the support you are looking for.

For example:

  • we need your contact details to respond to your enquiry or complaint.
  • if you kindly choose to make a one-off or regular donation to us and allow us to claim Gift Aid.

Information you give us indirectly

Your information may be shared with us by third parties, for example where you have consented for them to do so or where there is an agreement/contract in place between us and the third party. These might include:

  • independent event organisers, for example fundraising sites like Just Giving;
  • professional fundraisers
  • subcontractors acting on our behalf who provide us with technical, payment or delivery services, our business partners, advertising networks analytics providers and search information providers.
  • Referrals made to us from another organisation or individual, such as your GP, if they think the service would be helpful to you.

You should check any privacy policy provided to you where you give your data to a third party.

When you visit this website

We, like many charities, automatically collect the following information:

  • technical information, including the type of device you’re using, the IP address, browser and operating system being used to connect your computer to the internet. This information may be used to improve the services we offer.
  • information about your visit to this website, for example we collect information about pages you visit and how you navigate the website, i.e. length of visits to certain pages, products and services you viewed and searched for, referral sources (e.g. how you arrived at our website).
  • We collect and use your personal information by using cookies on our website. Some of these cookies can be enabled/disabled by selecting your preferences in the preference centre you are presented with when first interacting with this site. More information on cookies can be found under the ‘Use of Cookies’ section below.

When you use social media

When you interact with us on social media platforms such as Facebook we may obtain information about you (for example, when you publicly tag us in an event photo). The information we receive will depend on the privacy preferences you have set on those types of platforms. If you interact with us in this way, we encourage you to read the Privacy Policy of the social media platform(s) you use.

As mentioned above, we collect and use your personal information by using cookies, including social media cookies (i.e., third party cookies). We may use social media cookies to enhance the functionality of our website and provide you with personalised content (see our Cookie Policy for more information).

Public Information

We supplement information on our supporters with information from publicly available sources such as annual reviews, corporate websites, public social media accounts, the electoral register, Mint UK, Google and Companies House in order to create a fuller understanding of someone’s interests and support. For more information, please see the section on ‘Building Profiles’ below.

 

What type of information is collected from you?

The information we collect, store and use from you may depend on the relationship you have with us. This might include:

  • your name and contact details (including postal address, email address and telephone number);
  • your date of birth
  • your communications with us, such as call recordings and emails you send. These communications may relate to general enquiries, requests for support or guidance, and complaints or feedback about our activities, products and services.
  • your bank or credit card details. If you make a donation your card information is not held by us, it is collected by our third-party payment processors, who specialise in the secure online capture and processing of credit/debit card transactions;
  • information as to whether you are a UK taxpayer so we can claim gift aid;
  • if you are a successful applicant to volunteer or work for us, we may ask for photographic ID to verify your identity. We may also collect your National Insurance number and information from the Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) where appropriate.

Data protection laws recognise certain categories of personal information as sensitive and therefore requiring greater protection, for example information about your health, ethnicity and religion.

We do not usually collect sensitive data about you unless there is a clear and valid reason for doing so and data protection laws allow us to. For example, we may ask for your health information if you are seeking help and advice relating to that information.

Where appropriate, we will make it clear why we are collecting this type of information and what it will be used for.

As a matter of principle we try not to retain any information that identifies you as a user of the Hub’s services unless necessary to provide that service, and even then we will limit what we record, and ai to destroy it as soon as it has served its purpose.

 

How and why is your information used?

The purposes for which we use your information may depend on the relationship you have with the Hub. We may use your information for a number of different purposes, which may include:

  • providing you with the services, products or information you asked for.
  • carrying out our obligations under any contracts entered into between you and us;
  • keeping a record of your relationship with us;
  • administering your donation or support your fundraising, including processing Gift Aid;
  • responding to or fulfil any requests, complaints or queries you make to us;
  • conducting analysis and market research to better understand how we can improve our services, products or information;
  • analysing the number and type of people who have used our services to demonstrate our impact and apply for funding
  • monitoring the interactions we have with our customers, donors and beneficiaries for quality control and compliance purposes to ensure we are delivering the service we and our regulators expect (See ‘Monitoring’ section below)
  • checking information we have collected about online and offline about you against third party sources so we can ensure that the information we hold about you is up to date and accurate
  • to monitor website-use to identify visitor location, guard against disruptive use, monitor website traffic, personalise information which is presented to you and/or to provide you with targeted advertisements
  • seeking your views or comments on the services we provide;
  • notifying you of changes to our services;
  • sending you communications which you have requested and that may be of interest to you. These may include information about campaigns, fundraising appeals and activities and promotions of goods and services;
  • communicating with you about the fundraising events you have signed-up for to help us raise important funds for our charitable work.
  • administering a legacy, where the charity is potentially the beneficiary of a legacy, we will obtain the names and contact details of executors, a copy of the will, and a grant of probate
  • checking donations for the purposes of prevention of fraud or other crime;
  • processing grant or job applications.

 

 

 

 

How and when will you hear from us

We respect your right to privacy, and we will only contact you about Pershore Wellbeing Hub if you are happy to hear from us or where appropriate to do so.

Fundraising and Marketing Communications

We may use your contact details to provide you with information about the vital work we do for our community, our fundraising appeals and opportunities to support us.

Email, text and phone

We will only send you marketing and fundraising communications by email text and telephone if you have explicitly provided your prior consent. This does not apply to service communications (see below).

We’ll always ask for your permission to contact you about our products and services in this way, for example:

  • when you sign a petition
  • when you make a donation
  • when you fundraise for us
  • when you contact the Hub Help Line
  • when you enquire about, or purchase, one of our products or services.

If you have signed up for one of our fundraising events, then we may contact you by email to tell you important information about the event (such as location details and what to bring on the day), provide information about similar leisure activities or events we think you will be interested in, share stories from our community of fundraisers, and provide useful fundraising tips to help you raise important funds for the Hub.

You can opt out of our marketing communications at any time. Please see “Your Choices” for further information.

Post

We may send you marketing and fundraising communications by post that we think may be of interest to you, unless you have told us that you would prefer not to hear from us in this way.

If we contact you by post with marketing and fundraising information, we do so under the lawful basis of legitimate interest.

This means that we send postal communications to achieve our charitable and/or organisational aims and ideals, whilst ensuring that doing so does not impinge on your privacy rights.

We believe that we have a legitimate interest to do this to raise vital funds, including via our trading subsidiaries, to sustain our charitable work to be there for older people who need us most.

We ask you if you would prefer not to hear from us in this way the first time you contact us, and you can opt out of postal communications at any point going forward. Please see ‘Your Choices’ for more information.

Service communications

We may send you certain communications, without your consent, if we are under a legal obligation to do so; if we feel sending the communication is in both yours and our interests; and/or it would be a disadvantage to you if we didn’t send you the communication.

These communications may include:

  • ‘Thank you’ emails to confirm receipt of your kind donations made to us online.

Registration confirmation, such as when you sign up to one of our events

Online advertising

We advertise on Facebook and Google as well as reserving the right to do so on other online platforms such as Instagram. We also place adverts on other websites to promote general awareness of the Hub our fundraising and services that we offer. We do this by:

  • Advertising on particular types of websites – for example newspapers and magazines’ websites.
  • Advertising to people signed up with an online platform (such as Facebook or Google) based on what the platform knows about them.

We may use the following re-marketing processes on some or all of specific online platforms.

  • ‘Look-alike’ / ‘Similar’ audiences: We send a list of ‘hashed’ email addresses to an online platform such as Facebook or Google (hashing is a security measure whereby the personal information is turned into a code).
  • ‘Custom audiences’/ ‘Customer matches’: We use a similar method as above to send information and support about our fundraising campaigns/ marketing campaigns to people who have already signed up for these.
  • ‘Saved’ audiences to remember which supporters on Facebook are most likely to respond to our fundraising, campaigning, and marketing requests.
  • Tracking people’s interactions with our adverts so that we know when an individual has clicked on an advert. This allows us to measure the effectiveness of our campaigns.

In some of the above instances, this means that if you have already visited our website, we can direct you back to it through ads shown on sites you visit across the internet by third party vendors. These third-party vendors include Google and Facebook. All parties may use cookies to serve these ads based on your past visits to our website.

You can object to your information being used by withholding permission on our cookie preference centre when you visit our site.

 

Using your information to tailor our work

Philanthropy

We research, and profile potential or existing high-value donors, to allow us to identify and engage with appropriate high-value donors. This allows us to focus our fundraising resources, and to ensure that our requests for support are tailored to each individual, ultimately helping us to maximise the efficiency of our fundraising. If you would prefer that we do not carry out this type of analysis, please contact us at info@pershorewellbeinghub.co.uk.

Profiling and analysis

We may analyse your personal information to create a profile of your interests and preferences so that we can tailor and target our communications in a way that is timely and relevant to you. We may make use of additional information about you when it is available from external sources to help us do this effectively. This allows us to be more focused, efficient, and cost-effective with our resources and also reduces the risk of someone receiving information they may find inappropriate or irrelevant.

We’re committed to putting you in control of your data so you’re free to opt out of your information being used in this way at any time by contacting info@pershorewellbeinghub.co.uk

We may also use your personal information to detect and reduce fraud and credit risk.

Website recording

Our website may also use technologies to monitor your use of our site. The types of information these technologies record may include IP address, mouse clicks, mouse movements, page scrolling and any text keyed into website forms. The information collected does not include bank details or any sensitive personal data and is stored and used for aggregated and statistical reporting. This information will be accessed by the Hub and trusted third-party agencies working on our behalf for the purpose of monitoring and improving the usability of the Pershore Wellbeing Hub website.

 

Who has access to your information?

We do not sell or rent your information to third parties.

We do not share your information with third parties for marketing purposes.

However, we may disclose your information to third parties in order to achieve the other purposes set out in this policy. These third parties may include:

Third parties working on our behalf

We may pass your information to our third-party service providers, suppliers, agents, subcontractors, and other associated organisations for the purposes of completing tasks and providing services to you on our behalf (for example to process donations and send you mailings). However, when we use these third parties, we disclose only the personal information that is necessary to deliver the services and we have a contract in place that requires them to keep your information secure and prevents them from using it for their own direct marketing purposes. Please be reassured that we will not release your information to third parties for them to use for their own direct marketing purposes, unless you have requested us to do so, or we are required to do so by law, for example, by a court order or for the purposes of prevention of fraud or other crime.

Third-party product providers we work with

Our trusted third-party product providers provide a range of products and services designed to help people make the most of life. When you enquire about one or more of these services, the relevant third-party product provider will use your details to provide you with information and carry out their obligations arising from any contracts you have entered with them. They will be acting as either a joint or independent controller of your information and therefore we advise you to read their Privacy Policy. These third-party product providers will share your information with us which we will use in accordance with this policy.

We may transfer your personal information to a third party as part of a sale of some or all of our business and assets to any third party or as part of any business restructuring or reorganisation, or if we’re under a duty to disclose or share your personal data in order to comply with any legal obligation or to enforce or apply our terms of use or to protect the rights, property or safety of our staff, supporters, customers, users of the website or others. However, we will take steps with the aim of ensuring that your privacy rights continue to be protected.

 

Lawful Processing

Data protection law requires us to rely on one or more lawful grounds to process your personal information. We consider the following grounds to be relevant:

Specific Consent

Where you have provided specific consent to us using your personal information in a certain way, such as to send you email, text and/or telephone marketing. Your specific consent is also used where you have agreed for us to use your personal information in case studies to promote our work.

Performance of a contract

Where we are entering into a contract with you or performing our obligations under it

Legal obligation

Where necessary so that we can comply with a legal or regulatory obligation to which we are subject, for example where we are ordered by a court or regulatory authority like the Charity Commission or Fundraising Regulator.

Vital interests

Where it is necessary to protect life or health (for example in the case of medical emergency suffered by an individual at one of our events) or a safeguarding issue which requires us to share your information with the emergency services.

Legitimate interests

Where it is reasonably necessary to achieve our or others’ legitimate interests (as long as what the information is used for is fair and does not duly impact your rights).

We consider our legitimate interests to be running the Hub as a charitable organisation in pursuit of our aims and ideals. For example to:

  • send postal communications which we think will be of interest to you;
  • send email communications about, and related to, fundraising events you have signed up for to help you raise important funds for our charitable work
  • conduct research to better understand our supporters and to improve the relevance of our fundraising;
  • understand how people choose/use our services and products;
  • determine the effectiveness of our services, promotional campaigns and advertising;
  • Sharing personal data amongst relevant teams within The Hub to ensure we communicate with our supporters in the most effective way;
  • Purchase marketing lists to promote our fundraising activity
  • monitor who we deal with to protect the charity against fraud, money laundering and other risks;
  • record and monitor interactions for quality and training purposes
  • enhance, modify, personalise or otherwise improve our services /communications for the benefit of our customers; and
  • better understand how people interact with our website.
  • Retain records and call recordings as evidence in defence of a legal claim.

When we legitimately process your personal information in this way, we consider and balance any potential impact on you (both positive and negative), and your rights under data protection laws. We will not use your personal information where our interests are overridden by the impact on you, for example, where use would be excessively intrusive (unless, for instance, we are otherwise required or permitted to by law).

When we use sensitive personal information, we require an additional legal basis to do so under data protection laws, so will either do so on the basis of your explicit consent or another route available to us at law (for example, if we need to process it for employment, social security or social protection purposes, your vital interests, or, in some cases, if it is in the public interest for us to do so).

 

Your choices

You have a choice about whether or not you wish to receive information from us. If you do not want to receive direct marketing communications from us about the vital work we do for older people and the exciting products and services you can buy, then you can select your choices by ticking the relevant boxes situated on the form used to collect your information.

We’re committed to putting you in control of your data so you’re free to change your marketing communication preferences (including to tell us that you don’t want to be contacted for marketing purposes) at any time using:

info@pershorewellbeinghub.co.uk,

or by telephone: 01386 555018,

or post: Pershore Wellbeing Hub, No. 4 High St, Pershore WR10 1BG.

We will not use your personal information for marketing purposes if you have indicated that you do not wish to be contacted and will retain your details on a suppression list to help ensure that we do not continue to contact you. However, we may still need to contact you for administrative purposes like where we are processing a donation or thanking you for your participation in an event.

 

 

 

 

Your Rights

Under UK data protection law, you have certain rights over the personal information that we hold about you. Here is a summary of the rights that we think apply:

Right of access

You have a right to request access to the personal data that we hold about you.

You also have the right to request a copy of the information we hold about you, and we will provide you with this unless legal exceptions apply.

If you want to access your information, contact us using our details below. Please be aware that we will ask you for proof of identity or alternative proof of authority before sharing any information we may hold.

Right to have your inaccurate personal information corrected

You have the right to have inaccurate or incomplete information we hold about you corrected. The accuracy of your information is important to us so we’re working on ways to make it easier for you to review and correct the information that we hold about you. In the meantime, if you change email address, or if you believe any of the other information we hold is inaccurate or out of date, please contact us via the contact details below.

Right to restrict use

You have a right to ask us to restrict the processing of some or all of your personal information if there is a disagreement about its accuracy, or we’re not lawfully allowed to use it.

Right of erasure

You may ask us to delete some or all of your personal information and in certain cases, and subject to certain exceptions; we will do so as far as we are required to. In many cases, we will anonymise that information, rather than delete it.

Right for your personal information to be portable

If we are processing your personal information (1) based on your consent, or in order to enter into or carry out a contract with you, and (2) the processing is being done by automated means, you may ask us to provide it to you or another service provider in a machine-readable format.

Right to object

You have the right to object to processing where we using your personal information (1) based on legitimate interests, (2) for direct marketing or (3) for statistical/research purposes.

If you want to exercise any of the above rights please contact us via the details below. We may be required to ask for further information and/or evidence of identity. We will endeavour to respond fully to all requests within one month of receipt of your request, however if we are unable to do so we will contact you with reasons for the delay.

Please note that exceptions apply to a number of these rights, and not all rights will be applicable in all circumstances. For more details we recommend you consult the guidance published by the UK’s Information Commissioner’s Office.

 

Keeping your information safe

When you give us personal information, both offline and online, we take steps to ensure that appropriate technical and organisational controls are in place to protect it.

Any sensitive information (such as credit or debit card details) provided to us via our website is encrypted and protected. When you are on a secure page, a lock icon will appear on the bottom of web browsers such as Microsoft Internet Explorer.

Non-sensitive details (your email address etc.) are transmitted normally over the internet, and this can never be guaranteed to be 100% secure. As a result, while we strive to protect your personal information, we cannot guarantee the security of any information you transmit to us, and you do so at your own risk. Once we receive your information, we make our best effort to ensure its security on our systems. Where we have given (or where you have chosen) a password which enables you to access certain parts of our website, you are responsible for keeping this password confidential. We ask you not to share your password with anyone.

 

Keeping your information up to date

We take reasonable steps to ensure your information is accurate and up to date.

Where possible we use publicly available sources to identify deceased records or whether you have changed address.

We really appreciate it if you let us know when your contact details change.

 

How long is your information kept for?

We keep your information for no longer than is necessary for the purposes it was collected for. The length of time we retain your personal information for is determined by operational and legal considerations, as well as best practice.

For example, we are legally required to hold some types of information to fulfill our statutory and regulatory obligations (e.g. health/safety and tax/accounting purposes).

Further reasons we may retain personal information include:

  • For our auditing purposes
  • Evidence in defence of a legal claim
  • Ensuring you are suppressed from marketing if you prefer never to hear from us in the future.
  • We review our retention periods on a regular basis.

If you would like to know more about how long we hold your personal data for please email us using the details below

 

Use of ‘cookies’

Like many other websites, this website uses cookies. ‘Cookies’ are small pieces of information sent by an organisation to your computer and stored on your hard drive to allow that website to recognise you when you visit. For example, we use cookies to store your country preference. This helps us to deliver a more personalised service when you browse our website and improves our services.

Pershore Wellbeing Hub has a Cookie Preference centre that allows you to control certain types of cookies that are used by the Hub. When anyone visits or is taken to our website, all Marketing/Targeting Cookies are opted out by default, meaning that individuals will only receive targeted online advertisements if they opt-in to these types of cookies. Cookies for Performance allow us to anonymously assess how effectively our website is working which in turn, ensures that we are giving all of our users the best experience. These cookies are opted in by default but you can opt if you wish. When you are presented with the preference centre select ‘Change Settings’ and navigate to the ‘Cookies for Performance’ tab and unselect the option presented.

It is possible to switch off cookies by setting your browser preferences. For more information on how to switch off cookies on your computer, visit our full cookies policy. Turning cookies off may result in a loss of functionality when using our website.

 

Links to other websites

Our website does contain links to other websites run by other organisations. This policy applies only to our website‚ so we encourage you to read the privacy statements on the other websites you visit. We cannot be responsible for the privacy policies and practices of other websites even if you access those using links from our website.

In addition, if you linked to our website from a third-party site, we cannot be responsible for the privacy policies and practices of the owners and operators of that third-party site and recommend that you check the privacy policy of that third-party site.

Any changes we may make to this policy in the future will be posted on our website so please check the appropriate page occasionally to ensure that you’re happy with any changes. If we make any significant changes we’ll make this clear on this website.

 

16 or Under

We are concerned to protect the privacy of children aged 16 or under. If you are aged 16 or under‚ please get your parent/guardian’s permission beforehand whenever you provide us with personal information.

 

Vulnerable circumstances

We are committed to protecting vulnerable supporters, customers and volunteers, and appreciate that additional care may be needed when we use their personal information. In recognition of this, we observe good practice guidelines in our interactions with vulnerable people.

 

Transferring your information outside of Europe

If you use our services while you are outside the EEA, your information may be transferred outside the EEA in order to provide you with those services.

As part of the services offered to you through this website, the information which you provide to us may be transferred to countries outside the European Economic Area (“EEA”). By way of example, this may happen if any of our servers are from time to time located in a country outside of the EEA. You should be aware that these countries may not have similar data protection laws to the UK. By submitting your personal data, you’re agreeing to this transfer, storing or processing. If we transfer your information outside of the EEA in this way, we will take steps to ensure that appropriate security measures are taken with the aim of ensuring that your privacy rights continue to be protected as outlined in this policy.

We undertake regular reviews of who has access to information that we hold to ensure that your info is only accessible by appropriately trained staff, volunteers and contractors.

 

Monitoring

Records of your personal information and interactions with us (including by email and telephone) may be monitored. This may include:

  • When you call or email us
  • When you speak to a volunteer
  • When you call to make a telephone donation to us
  • When you call or email to update your details with us
  • When you call or email to make a complaint or provide feedback

We will let you know that your call may be recorded when you contact us by telephone, and we will only ask for the personal information that we need to provide you with the service you are looking for.

The purposes for which we monitor your communications with us are:

  • training and quality assurance to help us continuously provide the best possible service
  • to report, analyse and learn from the complaints and feedback that we receive.

 

Complaints

We welcome, and take seriously, all complaints and feedback about our work.

If you make a complaint to us, we will collect and use your information to respond to your concerns.

If your complaint relates to an area of our work where we employ a third-party processor or product provider, we may share your personal information with that third party to investigate your concerns.

We will keep a record of your complaint for 7 years from the date that we deem the complaint closed.

 

Changes to this policy

Any changes we may make to this policy in the future will be posted on our website so please check this page occasionally to ensure that you’re happy with any changes. If we make any significant changes we’ll make this clear on this

 

 

 

Contact Details

 

If you have any questions about this privacy notice, please contact the Data Protection Officer:

Dr Chris Perks         info@pershorewellbeinghub.co.uk

info@pershorewellbeinghub.co.uk,

or by telephone: 01386 555018,

or post: Pershore Wellbeing Hub, No. 4 High St, Pershore WR10 1BG.

 

Grievance Policy & Procedure

Date: 12 22
Review: 01 24

 

Introduction

Pershore Wellbeing Hub has a commitment to promote mutual respect and trust between the trustee board and its staff, volunteers and users. We wish to demonstrate through this policy that that we value every individual and will support them to raise any issues of grievance knowing that these will be treated sensitively and appropriately.

This policy promotes a culture of compliance, honesty and ethical behaviour within Pershore Wellbeing Hub. Pershore Wellbeing Hub’s aim is to encourage staff, volunteers and visitors to report any wrongdoing in good faith and in an environment free from victimisation.

Scope

This policy applies to all Staff members and volunteers working for or with Pershore Wellbeing Hub.

This policy sets out the minimum requirements for Pershore Wellbeing Hub.

Grievances are concerns, problems or complaints that employees or volunteers raise with the Hub.

 

The Code does not apply to redundancy dismissals or the non‑renewal of fixed-term contracts on their expiry.

 

 

 

Grievance Policy & Procedure

 

Raising a Grievance

 

If an employee or volunteer has a problem (‘grievance’) at work it’s usually a good idea for them to raise it informally first.

The Hub will respond even if the problem’s raised informally.

 

A grievance procedure is a formal way for an employee or volunteer to raise a problem or complaint to the Hub.

The employee or volunteer can raise a grievance if:

  • they feel raising it informally has not worked
  • they do not want it dealt with informally
  • it’s a very serious issue, for example sexual harassment or ‘whistleblowing‘ (see whistleblowing policy)

 

The formal grievance should be in writing and addressed to the chair of the trustee board. If the grievance is about the chair then the grievance can be addressed to any of the Hub’s trustees, who will take the issue further.

The written complaint should set out the nature of the grievance and, where possible, give an indication as to what the complainant would like to see as an outcome.

 

Initial Meeting

The chair (or nominated deputy) of the trustee board will hold a meeting with the complainant to gain further information about the complaint and how they think it should be resolved. Consideration should be given to adjourning the meeting for any investigation that may be necessary. The complainant and the board will make every reasonable effort to attend a meeting.

The complainant can be accompanied at the meeting: the statutory right in employment situations is to be accompanied by a fellow worker, a trade union representative, or an official employed by a trade union. The Hub extends this right to volunteers. Such a request to be accompanied should be reasonable and timely enough to allow the Hub to comply. Such a request does not need to be in writing.

If a complainant’s chosen companion will not be available at the time proposed for the hearing by the Hub, the Hub must postpone the hearing to a time proposed by the complainant provided that the alternative time is both reasonable and not more than five working days after the date originally proposed. The companion should be allowed to address the hearing to put and sum up the complainant’s case, respond on their behalf to any views expressed at the meeting and confer with them during the hearing. The companion does not, however, have the right to answer questions on the complainant’s behalf, address the hearing if the complainant does not wish it or prevent the Hub from explaining their case.

The meeting can be adjourned for any investigation that may be necessary.

 

Decide on appropriate action

Following the meeting the Hub’s representatives will decide on what action, if any, to take. Decisions will be communicated to the complainant, in writing, without unreasonable delay and, where appropriate, should set out what action the Hub intends to take to resolve the grievance. The complainant should be informed that they can appeal if they are not content with the action taken.

 

Allow the employee to take the grievance further if not resolved

Where a complainant feels that their grievance has not been satisfactorily resolved they should appeal. They should let their employer know the grounds for their appeal without unreasonable delay and in writing.

Appeals will be heard without unreasonable delay and at a time and place which should be notified to the complainant in advance.

The appeal should be dealt with impartially and wherever possible by a trustee, or group of trustees, who has (have) not previously been involved in the case.

The Hub extends the same right to be accompanied at any such appeal hearing as set out above.

The outcome of the appeal should be communicated to the complainant in writing without unreasonable delay.

 

Overlapping grievance and disciplinary cases

Where a complainant raises a grievance during a disciplinary process the disciplinary process may be temporarily suspended in order to deal with the grievance. Where the grievance and disciplinary cases are related it may be appropriate to deal with both issues concurrently. (See separate disciplinary process).

 

Collective grievances

The provisions of this Code do not apply to grievances raised on behalf of two or more employees or volunteers by a representative of a recognised trade union or other appropriate workplace representative. These grievances should be handled in accordance with the organisation’s collective grievance process.

 

Health and Safety Policy

Date: 12 22
Review: 01 24

 

Introduction

Pershore Wellbeing Hub has a commitment to protecting the privacy and security of all users of, visitors to, and contractors at the Hub.

This policy describes how we aim to do that.

This policy promotes a culture of compliance, honesty and ethical behaviour within Pershore Wellbeing Hub.

Supplementary to this general Policy Statement, as necessary, there will be specific policies and procedures describing, in detail, health and safety provisions in each part of the organisation.

STATEMENT OF INTENT

It is the policy of Pershore Wellbeing Hub to ensure, so far as is reasonably practicable, the health, safety and welfare of its employees while they are at work and of others who may be affected by their undertakings, and to comply with the Health and Safety at Work etc. Act 1974 and all other allied relevant legislation as appropriate.

OBJECTIVES

In order to achieve compliance with the statement of policy, Pershore Wellbeing Hub has set the following objectives:

  • To set and maintain high standards for health and safety at Pershore Wellbeing Hub;
  • To identify risks and set in place programmes to remove or reduce these risks
  • To ensure that these standards are communicated to all employees and volunteers
  • To ensure that all personnel are given the necessary information, instruction and training to enable them to work in a safe manner
  • To ensure the dissemination and discussion of relevant information on safety and health issues
  • To develop promotional campaigns and otherwise to encourage safety and health awareness of employees and volunteers
  • To monitor its operations at Pershore Wellbeing Hub.

SCOPE

This policy applies to:

(a) All staff members

(b) Contractors

(c) Volunteers

(d) Visitors to Pershore Wellbeing Hub premises, to the extent it is relevant to them.

In this policy, ‘workplace’ includes working on site or off-site, attendance at a work-related conference or function, and attendance at a client or other work-related event.

 

 

 

RESPONSIBILITIES

To ensure the prevention of ill health and the avoidance of accidents, and the promotion of safe and healthy workplaces the following responsibilities have been established.

The Pershore Wellbeing Hub Trustees

The Pershore Wellbeing Hub Trustees have established the overall Health and Safety Policy. They have responsibility for implementing and monitoring the policy principally through the Wellbeing Hub Manager.

Wellbeing Hub Manager

The Wellbeing Hub Manager is responsible for:

  • Keeping the Pershore Wellbeing Hub’s Health and Safety Policy under review and ensuring that it is revised as and when necessary
  • Monitoring the Policy’s implementation, and setting targets or objectives where appropriate
  • Reporting on progress to Pershore Wellbeing Hub’s Trustees
  • Bringing to Pershore Wellbeing Hub’s Trustees attention any faults or areas of weakness in the Policy or its implementation
  • Ensuring that the relevant resources are made available to enable the policy to be implemented
  • The practical implementation of the Health and Safety policy, the Health and Safety at Work etc. Act 1974, and other relevant legislation
  • Ensuring that the operations under their control are, as far as is reasonably practicable, conducted without detriment to the health and safety of employees or others who may be affected by their activities
  • Ensuring that their area of responsibility is subject to risk assessment, regular inspections and audits
  • Ensuring that all accidents, incidents and near misses, within their area of responsibility, are reported, reviewing all such reports and ensuring that a full investigation is carried out and appropriate remedial action taken, where necessary.

YOU

If you have a problem:

If you have any issues about your Health and Safety in your workplace that has not been resolved by talking to the Wellbeing Hub Manager. You should refer to the Pershore Wellbeing Hub’s Whistleblowing Policy if you feel that your issue has not been resolved by escalation to the Wellbeing Hub Manager.

 

SAFETY REPRESENTATIVES

 

NAME

is Pershore Wellbeing Hub’s Safety Representative.

The role of the Safety Representative is to:

  • Communicate policy on all health and safety matters within their work areas
  • Encourage all personnel to be involved in matters of health and safety
  • Carry out periodic inspections to identify unsafe equipment, working conditions, practices and fire hazards, make reports of findings and recommendations regarding the remedying of any defects
  • Assist with risk assessments
  • Assist with accident investigation
  • Consult with trustees and managers on all issues of health and safety
  • Responsible for Health and Safety in Pershore Wellbeing Hub (inclusive of paid staff, volunteers and visitors)

 

All individuals are required to:

  • Co-operate in implementing the requirements of all Health and Safety legislation, related codes of practice and safety instructions
  • Refrain from doing anything which constitutes a danger to themselves or others
  • Immediately bring to the attention of their line management/supervisor/office contact any situations or practices that are noted which may lead to injuries or ill health
  • Act in accordance with Pershore Wellbeing Hub’s Whistleblowing Policy if they believe it is necessary to invoke the procedures within
  • Ensure that any equipment issued to them, or for which they are responsible, is correctly used and properly stored
  • Be responsible for good housekeeping in the area in which they are working
  • Report all accidents, incidents, dangerous occurrences and near misses, in accordance with Pershore Wellbeing Hub’s guidance.

 

CONTRACTORS

All Contractors working at Pershore Wellbeing Hub are required to comply with appropriate rules and regulations governing their work activities. Contractors are legally responsible for their own workforce and for ensuring that their work is carried out in a safe manner.

 

COMMUNICATION

The name of the person designated with the responsibility for health and safety in Pershore Wellbeing Hub is to be prominently displayed for the information of all employees, volunteers and visitors.

 

CONSULTATION AND TRAINING

Pershore Wellbeing Hub’s Trustees are committed to involving employees and volunteers at all levels in the maintenance of Health and Safety standards and to provide them with adequate information, instruction and training. External Health and Safety consultants will be used to provide professional health, safety, and occupational advice, as required.

 

INSURANCE

A hard copy of the current Certificate of Employers’ Liability Insurance is to be displayed where staff, volunteers and visitors can view.

 

POLICY REVIEW

The effectiveness of the Health and Safety policy statement will be reviewed annually as a minimum unless legislative changes necessitate revision prior to this.

 

Safeguarding Policy

Date: 12 22
Review: 01 24

 

Introduction

Pershore Wellbeing Hub has a commitment to its volunteers and visitors to ensure their safety at all times.

It is recommended that PWH adopts an Safeguarding policy

 

The Charity Commission highlights to all charities the importance of providing a safe and trusted environment for anyone who comes into contact with them, including staff and volunteers; and that, if something goes wrong in a charity, trustees are accountable and responsible for putting things right. The Trustees accept this responsibility and will ensure that Pershore Wellbeing Hub safeguarding practices are robust.

 

Pershore Wellbeing Hub does not work directly with children and vulnerable adults as defined by safeguarding legislation. However, it is recognised that staff and volunteers do encounter people in challenging situations who may be vulnerable or at risk. Pershore Wellbeing Hub is committed to proactively safeguarding and promoting the welfare of its service users, staff and volunteers to taking reasonable steps to ensure those who come into contact with Pershore Wellbeing Hub or Pershore Wellbeing’s Hub promoted/associated programmes do not, as a result, come to any harm.

 

This policy relates to Pershore Wellbeing Hub’s commitments to safeguarding (as defined by the Charity Commission) and protecting its service users. Where any suspected wrongdoing is in relation to staff and volunteers, the procedure set out in Pershore Wellbeing Hub’s Whistleblowing or Complaints Policy should be followed, as appropriate. Over recent years there has been increasing recognition of the way in which vulnerable people can be at risk of harm from organisations and institutions that are supposed to help them, either because of abuse and exploitation by individuals in positions of trust, or via programme activities in general.

Therefore, there has been a significant increase in the efforts made by agencies to ensure that no harm comes to clients or target communities from contact

with their staff and associates or because of any of the organisation’s activities.

 

This duty of care extends beyond statutory safeguarding requirements. Pershore Wellbeing Hub does not engage in any activity with children or vulnerable adults that is regulated by domestic safeguarding legislation, but it does take seriously its obligations to operate in a way that ensures, so far as is possible, that its work does no harm to anyone with whom it engages.

 

Given these values, and in light of widely recognised risks, Pershore Wellbeing Hub has developed this policy to promote protection for all those people it comes into contact with, as well as staff and volunteers within Pershore Wellbeing Hub itself and the partner organisations with which it has relationships.

 

Should it come into contact with vulnerable groups (including children), Pershore Wellbeing Hub takes responsibility to ensure it does all it can to protect such groups from all forms of harm, including abuse, neglect and exploitation and to ensure appropriate action is taken if such harm occurs.

 

It is clear that vulnerable persons can be harmed, or put at risk of harm, by organisations and institutions, and that abuse of vulnerable groups (including children) can happen in all types of organisations. Such harm may result from unintentional acts or deliberate actions.

 

Unintentional acts may lead to harm due to a lack of ‘due diligence’ or competence or through organisational negligence, such as inadequate care and supervision, lack of policies, procedures, and guidance to inform programming and practice, or lack of staff compliance with legal requirements. Also, deliberate actions may be taken by people with intent to abuse vulnerable people.

 

Pershore Wellbeing Hub will maintain a risk register, which will be regularly reviewed, which identifies risks to the charity and how they will be managed and mitigated.

Safeguarding Contacts      Can be found at the end of this policy, and below

Policy

 

 

For the Pershore Wellbeing Hub’s staff, contractors and volunteers

 

Compliance with this policy is mandatory for all Pershore Wellbeing Hub staff. For the purposes of this policy ‘staff is defined as anyone who works for, or is engaged by Pershore Wellbeing Hub, either in a paid or unpaid, full time or part time capacity. This includes directly employed staff, contractors, agency staff, consultants, volunteers, interns and equivalents.

 

 

 

Trustee Members

 

Trustee’s must act at all times in the best interests of Pershore Wellbeing Hub and its ultimate service users. Trustees are also required to comply with this policy. This requirement is made clear to trustees through the Trustee induction training.

 

 

 

For partnership organisations

 

This policy also applies to other organisations with whom Pershore Wellbeing Hub works.  Pershore Wellbeing Hub expects that the principles and approaches already

shared with partnership organisations mean that they will fully support the values and commitments set out in this policy.  Pershore Wellbeing Hub recognises that some will already have protection policies and associated measures in place. Where this is the case, they should have no difficulty in also complying with the standards set out in this policy.

 

Pershore Wellbeing Hub will ensure that each partner has appointed a member of staff who will be responsible for promptly reporting to Pershore Wellbeing Hub’s Designated Safeguarding Officer (or, in the event that they are unavailable the Deputy Designated Safeguarding Officer or other appropriate person) any safeguarding concerns that arise in, or are relevant to, the context of the partnership.

 

 

 

Statement of Commitments

 

Pershore Wellbeing Hub commits to taking all reasonable measures to ensure vulnerable groups (including children) impacted by projects and programmes delivered and/or supported by Pershore Wellbeing Hub are protected as far as possible from harm, including exploitation, neglect and abuse of all kinds.  While the Trustees recognises that Pershore Wellbeing Hub does not work with people who fulfil the legal definition of vulnerable, we will often work with people who by the very nature of the situation they are in, are vulnerable. Pershore Wellbeing Hub seeks to ensure that this is understood by all staff and volunteers.

 

 

 

 

Pershore Wellbeing Hub commits to:

 

 

  • Developing a zero tolerance ‘safety culture’ within Pershore Wellbeing Hub that creates and maintains protective environments.

 

  • Placing safeguarding at the heart of recruitment practices by carrying out the highest level of DBS or other criminal record checks to which we are entitled, requesting two written references, considering gaps in work history, checking qualifications and certifications and, where appropriate, confirming a person’s right to work in the UK.

 

  • Basic DBS checks will be required every 3 years, for relevant volunteers & staff during employment. Employees will be contacted prior to this anniversary, requesting that they complete the required paperwork so the re-check can be undertaken. If the paperwork is not received back in time and there is not a new certificate received before the 3-year anniversary is reached, any activities that are regulated under the scheme cannot be undertaken until the appropriate documentation is received.

 

  • As recommended within Safer Recruitment guidelines, during the recruitment process all applicants are required to submit their application using the form provided and applications received in a different format will be rejected. This allows for ease of comparison and to ensure we obtain all the information we require.

 

  • A Trustee and Volunteer will be provided with Safer Recruitment training. This training will be refreshed every 3 years.

 

  • A copy of this policy and the Whistleblowing Policy will be included in all recruitment application packs.

 

  • Ensuring Pershore Wellbeing Hub staff and Trustees are fully cognisant of protection issues and adhere to Pershore Wellbeing Hub’s code of conduct.

 

  • Increasing understanding and raising the awareness of staff and trustees of risks

relating to safeguarding within the organisation and in connection with its activities.

 

  • Taking appropriate and proportionate action if the policy is not complied with.

 

  • Developing criteria so that staff understand what constitutes non-compliance.

 

  • Maintaining adequate insurance in relation to the charity’s activities and the people involved, to the extent that it is reasonably available.

 

  • Carrying out appropriate due diligence on partners, which may include ensuring they have appropriate controls and safeguarding measures in place; meet any applicable international standards in carrying out their activities; and integrating safeguarding and onward reporting requirements in Pershore Wellbeing Hub partnership or funding-related agreements, taking account of the Charity Commission’s relevant guidance.

 

  • Making sure people protection considerations are integrated into all aspects of the organisation.

 

  • Including safeguarding as a standing agenda item at each meeting of Trustees and the senior leadership team.

 

  • Ensuring all staff and trustees are aware of their responsibilities to report concerns and of steps to take/who to go to in order to report such concerns.

 

  • Ensuring that safeguarding concerns are addressed promptly and through the appropriate channels.

 

  • Reporting safeguarding incidents, allegations or concerns to external authorities and regulators, as appropriate, and in accordance with best practice. Pershore Wellbeing Hub will fully risk assess such reporting to ensure that making a report is not likely to cause further harm to the individual(s) to whom harm has (actually, allegedly or potentially) already been caused.

 

  • Ensure staff record incidents via the Safeguarding Record Form, which is returned to the designated safeguarding lead who in turn provides details of incidents and trends to the Council of Management.

 

  • Ensuring that its General Data Protection policy remains suitably updated so that it is clear that, in keeping with Pershore Wellbeing Hub’s zero tolerance policy, it will report wrongdoing on the part of its trustees, staff and partners to appropriate authorities; will share such information as may be necessary to protect individuals from harm; and will provide fair and accurate references, which appropriately reflect Pershore Wellbeing Hub’s experience and interaction with trustees, staff and partners.

 

 

 

Embedding organisational commitment

 

In order to make its policy commitments a practical reality, Pershore Wellbeing Hub will instigate or strengthen a range of measures that focus on making sure this policy and associated procedures are in place, that people are supported to understand and work within the provisions of the policy, that it is fully and effectively integrated into all of our activities, and that it is subject to monitoring and review.

 

Pershore Wellbeing Hub staff, volunteers and trustees will receive regular training/briefing on their responsibilities and obligations under this policy and it will form part of the induction for new staff and trustees.

 

Staff, volunteers (and trustees) will be expected to acknowledge and accept their responsibilities under this policy. Breaches of this policy by staff will be treated seriously and will be dealt with under disciplinary procedures, or termination of the relationship by other means. Breaches by volunteers and trustees may result in the termination of their Association Membership.

 

 

 

Reporting & responding to concerns

 

Pershore Wellbeing Hub staff and volunteers are required to report any concerns or suspicions of possible/actual harm to a client (or other person connected to the charily), including abuse, exploitation and neglect and policy non-compliance, or risk of such, resulting from action or inaction by anyone covered by this policy. This includes any suspected, alleged or actual historical abuse. In the first instance any concerns should be reported to the Designated Safeguarding Officer and a safeguarding record form should be completed.

 

The person making the report should otherwise keep the matter strictly confidential and not seek to investigate the incident or suspicion.

 

The Safeguarding Lead Trustee, who sits on Pershore Wellbeing Hub’s Board of Trustees, will have oversight of safeguarding and welfare arrangements and will receive reports of any safeguarding and welfare incidents that arise.  The safeguarding Lead Trustee will report regularly to the board of trustees.

 

The names of the Designated Safeguarding Officer and Safeguarding Lead Trustee can be found in the ‘Contact Information’ section at the end of this policy.  Pershore Wellbeing Hub is committed to reporting all relevant incidents to the Charity Commission for England and Wales via a serious incident report. We will also report incidents to other regulatory bodies and government departments or funding bodies, where appropriate. Where there is evidence that criminal activity may have taken place, or concerns have been raised in relation to a child or vulnerable adult, we will report to the relevant police and/or safeguarding authorities as appropriate (for example to the relevant Local Authority Designated Officer (LADO) or Adult Safeguarding Board, taking appropriate account of the Charity Commission’s guidance in this respect.

 

Decisions to report to external authorities will be fully risk assessed and anonymisation/pseudonymisation considered when necessary. Reporting will not be avoided on the basis that it may harm Pershore Wellbeing Hub’s reputation or give rise to litigation and any concerns in relation to data protection will not act as a barrier to reporting, although they will be carefully considered to ensure that the disclosure is made within the legal framework for so doing.

 

Pershore Wellbeing Hub will develop strategies and tools to ensure effective implementation of this policy and to enable the Designated Safeguarding Officer, Trustees and others to monitor its performance.

 

Safeguarding concerns raised against any member of Pershore Wellbeing Hub staff or volunteer will be investigated by an external agency to ensure the process is fair and transparent.

 

Existing systems for risk management, due diligence, monitoring and evaluation, audit and review, and other organisational performance mechanisms will be adapted to include indicators and processes by which implementation of the safeguarding policy can be measured and these processes will be periodically reviewed to ensure that they remain effective and up-to-date in respect of best practice.

 

Pershore Wellbeing Hub will implement and keep updated a Whistleblowing and a Complaints Policy aimed at encouraging a culture of openness and accountability wherein staff and members of the public are confident that they can raise any matter of genuine concern without fear of reprisal in the knowledge that they will be taken seriously and that matters will be investigated appropriately and managed on a need-to-know basis, with appropriate remedial action taken.

 

 

Policy Review

 

 

We are committed to reviewing our policy and good practice regularly. This policy will be reviewed by the Trustees at least annually, when there is a change in UK law and/or best practice, or when an incident occurs that highlights a need for change –

whichever occurs first.

 

 

Safeguarding contacts

 

Contact Information at the Hub

 

Pershore Wellbeing Hub’s Designated Safeguarding Officer is Dr Gill Perks.

 

The Deputy Designated Safeguarding Officer is Dr Chris Perks

 

Pershore Wellbeing Hub’s Safeguarding Lead Trustee is Dr Gill Perks.

 

These individuals have access to the email inbox for reporting concerns, which is

gill@pershorewellbeinghub.co.uk

 

If you are not comfortable with submitting your report via email to that address, please call 01386 555018 and ask to speak with the relevant person, or contact Worcestershire County Council Safeguarding Team

 

Worcestershire County Council

Safeguarding Team Children

 

 

If you have reason to believe that a child, young person or adult is at immediate risk from harm contact the Police:          telephone: 999

If you have any concerns about a child or young person living in Worcestershire and feel that they may be in need of protection or safeguarding contact the Family Front Door  on        01905 822666.

Staff are available Monday to Thursday from  9.00am to 5.00pm and Fridays from 9.00am to 4.30pm.

 

For assistance out of office hours (weekdays and all day at weekends and bank holidays):            telephone: 01905 768020

More information is available at    Worcestershire Safeguarding

https://www.safeguardingworcestershire.org.uk/

 

 

Worcestershire County Council Safeguarding Team Adults

 

You might have concerns about abuse and neglect for yourself or someone you know.

if it is an emergency dial 999

to report a crime or potential crime to the Police you can phone the non-emergency number 101

to report a safeguarding concern please call 01905 768053

if you would like safeguarding advice please phone the Adult Safeguarding Team on 01905 843189 (note this number does not accept referrals)

 

professionals can complete an online form to report concerns about abuse or neglect  at

https://capublic.worcestershire.gov.uk/AdultsSafeguardingConcern/

 

 

 

 

 

Policy Ownership

 

Pershore Wellbeing Hub’s Chair of Trustees is responsible for this policy and its

implementation.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SAFEGUARDING OVERVIEW

 

Pershore Wellbeing Hub is committed to:

  • Creating a safe and welcoming environment where everyone is respected and valued.
  • Ensuring that safeguarding within the organisation actively promotes the prevention of harm, harassment, bullying, abuse, and neglect.
  • Protecting an adult’s right to live safely free from abuse and neglect.
  • Preventing and reducing the risks of abuse and neglect with care and support.
  • Making sure that wellbeing is promoted.
  • Ensuring Safeguarding is everybody’s responsibility.

 

What is abuse?

Abuse may be a single act or it can continue over an extended period of time and may take different forms.  It can lead to a violation of someone’s human and civil rights by another person or persons and can be the result of an act or a failure to act.

Whether you come into regular contact with vulnerable groups or not, it is important that you can spot the signs of abuse and report them quickly.

 

Your duty in safeguarding

In you work, you will come into contact with adults at risk, whether in an employed or voluntary capacity, you have a duty of care towards them.

You should be signed up to the agreed safeguarding policy and procedures within your organisation. Employers must ensure that all staff including volunteers are trained and understand their responsibilities in:

  1. Recognising possible signs of abuse
  2. Responding to safeguarding concerns appropriately.
  3. Raising adult safeguarding concerns where these are identified.
  4. Sharing information appropriately where this may prevent abuse.

Who is an adult at risk

  1. Mental health issues.
  2. Illness.
  3. Age.
  4. Sensory impairment.
  5. Disability.

 

 

Key principles

  1. Empowerment

People being supported and encouraged to make their own decisions and give informed consent.

  1. Prevention

It is better to take action before harm occurs.

  1. Proportionality

The least intrusive response appropriate to the risk presented.

  1. Protection

Support and representation for those in greatest need.

  1. Partnership

Local solutions through services working with their communities.

  1. Accountability

Accountability and transparency in safeguarding practice.

 

 

Common  types of abuse:

There are many different types of abuse and they all result in behaviour towards a person that deliberately or intentionally causes harm.

 

Physical:                                This includes assault, hitting, slapping, pushing or restraining someone.

Domestic:                              This includes psychological, physical, sexual, financial or emotional.

Sexual:                                   This includes rape, indecent exposure, sexual harassment inappropriate touching or sexual assault.

Financial or material:          This includes theft, fraud, internet scamming or the misuse/stealing of property.

Psychological:                      This includes emotional abuse threats of harm or abandonment, humiliation, controlling, intimidation, harassment, verbal abuse or isolation.

Discriminatory:                    This includes types of harassment or insults because of someone’s race, gender, gender identity, age, disability, sexual orientation or religion.

Modern slavery:                   This includes slavery, human trafficking and forced labour.

Institutional:                          This includes neglect and poor care in an institution or care setting.

Neglect:                                This includes ignoring medical emotional or physical care needs,or not giving someone what they need to help them live.

Self- neglect:                        This includes a wide range of behaviour which shows someone is not caring for themselves.

 

 

Patterns of abuse

Serial abuse:                         Where the person alleged to have caused harm seeks out or quote grooms those individuals at risk of abuse.

Long term abuse:                In the context of an on-going family relationship such as domestic violence between spouses, partners or between generations.

Opportunistic abuse:          Such as theft occurring because money or goods have been left around.

Situational abuse:                Where pressures have built up in coping with an individual’s difficult or challenging behaviour.

 

How a concern may come to your attention

Anybody can raise a safeguarding concern for themselves or another person.

A concern may be …

Something the adult has disclosed to you.

Something you have been told by a colleague, a friend, a relative, a carer or another.

Something you witnessed for yourself.

It is important to remember that there may be concerns that have been identified or raised by others of which you may not be aware.

 

Talking to an adult you suspect is being abused

Often abuse and neglect can be prevented if issues are identified and raised as soon as they arise, so that they can be addressed at the earliest point.

  1. Discuss the concern and obtain their views on the matter.
  2. Give them information about the adult safeguarding process.
  3. Explain confidentiality issues how they will be kept informed and supported.
  4. Identify communication needs personal care arrangements and access requests.
  5. Discuss what could be done to make them feel safer.

The person alleged to be the source of the risk should not be present.

Responding to an adult who discloses abuse.

 

 

Some incidents of abuse only come to light because the abused person discloses the information themselves

  1. Accept what the person is saying do not question the person or get them to justify what they are saying.
  2. Do not formally interview the person just listen calmly to what they are saying.
  3. You can ask open questions to establish the basic facts but try to avoid asking the person to repeat what they have said.
  4. Do not promise the person that you keep what they tell you confidential.
  5. Reassure them and tell them that you will treat this information seriously.

 

 

Manager’s roles and responsibilities towards volunteers.

Pershore Wellbeing Hub will ensure that all volunteers have the appropriate support training and supervision to carry out their role in a competent manner.

Conducting regular reviews of the safeguarding log and ensure follow up work is carried out which includes volunteer training.

 

 

 

Safeguarding contacts

 

Contact Information at the Hub

 

Pershore Wellbeing Hub’s Designated Safeguarding Officer is Dr Gill Perks.

 

The Deputy Designated Safeguarding Officer is Dr Chris Perks

 

Pershore Wellbeing Hub’s Safeguarding Lead Trustee is Dr Gill Perks.

 

These individuals have access to the email inbox for reporting concerns, which is

gill@pershorewellbeinghub.co.uk

 

If you are not comfortable with submitting your report via email to that address, please call 01386 555018 and ask to speak with the relevant person, or contact Worcestershire County Council Safeguarding Team

 

Worcestershire County Council

Safeguarding Team Children

 

 

If you have reason to believe that a child, young person or adult is at immediate risk from harm contact the Police:          telephone: 999

If you have any concerns about a child or young person living in Worcestershire and feel that they may be in need of protection or safeguarding contact the Family Front Door  on        01905 822666.

Staff are available Monday to Thursday from  9.00am to 5.00pm and Fridays from 9.00am to 4.30pm.

 

For assistance out of office hours (weekdays and all day at weekends and bank holidays):            telephone: 01905 768020

More information is available at    Worcestershire Safeguarding

https://www.safeguardingworcestershire.org.uk/

 

 

Worcestershire County Council Safeguarding Team Adults

 

You might have concerns about abuse and neglect for yourself or someone you know.

if it is an emergency dial 999

to report a crime or potential crime to the Police you can phone the non-emergency number 101

to report a safeguarding concern please call 01905 768053

if you would like safeguarding advice please phone the Adult Safeguarding Team on 01905 843189 (note this number does not accept referrals)

 

professionals can complete an online form to report concerns about abuse or neglect  at

https://capublic.worcestershire.gov.uk/AdultsSafeguardingConcern/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Safeguarding Records Form

To be completed by the person raising the concern
Name of Client
Age if known
Address

 

 

Nature of Concern

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Recorded by
Date recorded
To be completed by Trustee
Shared with others?

 

If yes, with whom

 

Action Taken

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Concern logged with Social Care?

 

 

Volunteer Policy and Agreement

Date: 12 22
Review: 01 24

 

  • Introduction

 

Pershore Wellbeing Hub has a commitment to look after our volunteers, and visitors within our charity in areas such as recruitment of volunteers, training and the environment of our premises. We wish to demonstrate that we value every individual and will support them in their volunteering role.

 

 

Thank you for becoming one of our valued team of volunteers and we hope you enjoy your new role.

 

This agreement states how Pershore Wellbeing Hub will support you as a volunteer and sets out what we expect from you and what you can expect from us.  It also tells you about your responsibilities as a volunteer.  Attached to this agreement is a general description of the role you have agreed to take on.

 

 

  • The Hub’s commitment to you
  1. Introduce you to how the organisation works and your role in it.
  2. Provide you with adequate information and training to carry out your role, understand the work of the charity and how our volunteers operate within it. We will support you if, at any time, you wish to reconsider your role.
  3. Provide regular informal support meetings.
  4. We will support you if opportunities arise for personal development within your volunteering role
  5. Suggest a 6-week trial period after which we will arrange a feedback session to discuss your role within the organisation and provide support if required.
  6. Ensure that you are dealt with in accordance with our equal opportunities policy
  7. Provide insurance cover while you undertake voluntary work at the Pershore wellbeing hub.
  8. Implement good health and safety practices to provide a safe working environment.
  9. Endeavour to resolve any grievances difficulties or problems you encounter while volunteering with us. In the event of an unresolved problem, we will offer an opportunity to discuss the issues.
  10. We will keep you informed about the development of our organisation
  11. We will offer you the opportunity, and encourage you, to comment on and contribute to the work of the charity.
  12. We will agree to pay approved expenses incurred during your role as a volunteer

 

  • As a volunteer you agree to:
  1. Work to the best of your ability giving ample notice when you are not available.
  2. To attend those training and support sessions which may be of benefit to your volunteering role
  3. Follow your role description and the rules and procedures of Pershore wellbeing hub, including health and safety, equal opportunities, and confidentiality.
  4. To read, understand and agree to act on the principles of the Confidentiality Policy and Safeguarding Policy
  5. To work as part of a team with other staff and volunteers
  6. To declare any possible conflict of interest arising from paid employment, or commitments to other voluntary, statutory or private organisations.
  7. Supply details of 2 individuals to provide references and agree to a police check (DBS- Disclosure and Barring service) being carried out where necessary.
  8. Undertake any relevant training for your role and attend external courses arranged for you to carry out your specific role on the understanding that if you fail to attend a pre-arranged course, you will be responsible for reimbursing any costs incurred.

 

 

 

 

4            Data and storage of information:

Pershore Wellbeing Hub will store the information you have provided to carry out your work as a volunteer. All data will be stored securely and only shared with other organisations with your permission, and only as necessary, such as references relating to your application to the Pershore Wellbeing Hub.

You have the right to view the data we hold about you, or request that some or all of your data is deleted at any time.

We may use the information to inform you of matters relevant to your work as a volunteer such as forthcoming events training courses etc.

If you are agreeable the Pershore Wellbeing Hub will keep a record of your information and matters relevant to your work as a volunteer such as forthcoming events and training courses

 

5       Agreement

This volunteer agreement is binding in honour only and is not intended to be a legally binding contract between the volunteer and the organisation.

As a volunteer, I have read the above and the attached volunteer policy.  I agree to this mutual commitment, which I can terminate at any time by notifying the scheme.  Neither party intend any employment relationship to be created, either now or at any time in the future. I am aware that the right is reserved by the charity to take out an enhanced CRB Check before I begin to volunteer.

If you are happy for the Pershore Wellbeing Hub to keep a record of your information and contact details, please sign and date below.

 

Signature.

 

Name.

 

Date.

 

Whistle Blowing Policy

Date: 12 22
Review: 01 24

 

Introduction

Pershore Wellbeing Hub has a commitment to promote an open culture within our charity, and amongst its staff, volunteers and users, and in the environment of our premises. We wish to demonstrate through this policy that that we value every individual and will support them to raise any issues of concern, knowing that these will be treated sensitively and appropriately.

This policy promotes a culture of compliance, honesty and ethical behaviour within Pershore Wellbeing Hub. Pershore Wellbeing Hub’s aim is to encourage staff, volunteers and visitors to report any wrongdoing in good faith and in an environment free from victimisation.

Scope

This policy applies to all Staff members, contractors, consultants, secondees and volunteers working for or with Pershore Wellbeing Hub.

This policy sets out the minimum requirements for Pershore Wellbeing Hub.

 

Policy

 

Pershore Wellbeing Hub is committed to high ethical standards throughout its activities and accordingly has implemented this whistleblowing policy which should be followed. Employees are encouraged to come forward and express any and all concerns that they have.

Pershore Wellbeing Hub will not accept wrongdoing as defined below, at any level. Accordingly, the procedure below provides external routes to follow if that is necessary.

 

 

Whistleblowing Definition

Whistleblowing is the disclosure of information which relates to suspected wrongdoing or dangers at work. This may include:

Criminal activity.

A failure to comply with a legal obligation.

A miscarriage of justice.

The endangering of an individual’s health and safety.

Damage to the environment.

Financial frauds and malpractice.

Bribery or corruption.

Abuse or neglect of vulnerable people.

A deliberate concealment of information relating to any of the above.

 

Disagreement on management decisions and other concerns not within the above categories should be dealt with through normal discussions with your manager or, if necessary, the Grievance Procedure.

We hope that staff will feel able to voice whistleblowing concerns openly under this policy. However, if you want to raise your concern confidentially, we will make every effort to keep your identity secret. If it is necessary for anyone investigating your concern to know your identity, we will discuss this with you. We do not encourage staff to make disclosures anonymously. Proper investigation may be more difficult or impossible if we cannot obtain further information from you. It is also more difficult to establish whether any allegations are credible and have been made in good faith.

Should it be found that an employee raises an untrue allegation maliciously that employee may be subject to disciplinary action up to and including summary dismissal.

Confidentiality, always has limits when a person’s life or health is at risk. Therefore the Hub trustees’ reserve the right to breach confidence, but only in such cases of danger to the complainant or another. In such a case permission will always be sought first, with explanation of why the trustees feel that such a step is justified.

 

 

Procedure

In the first instance, you should speak privately to the Trustees who have responsibility for whistleblowing, (details provided below). Be clear that the issue you are raising should be considered under the whistle-blowing policy.

You may wish to come forward with a work colleague or friend.

If disclosure to the whistleblowing Trustees would not be appropriate given the issue, you should contact the Chairman for a confidential meeting. You should indicate that you wish your disclosure to be handled under the whistle-blowing policy.

Internal procedures should be followed except in exceptional circumstances.

Contact details of the person responsible for Whistleblowing

 

 

External disclosures

The aim of this policy is to provide an internal mechanism for reporting, investigating and remedying any wrongdoing in the workplace. In most cases you should not find it necessary to alert anyone externally.

The law recognises that in some circumstances it may be appropriate for you to report your concerns to an external body such as a regulator. We strongly encourage you to seek advice before reporting a concern to anyone external.

In the event that the disclosure is of a sufficiently serious nature or you feel it is impossible to use internal channels, or if you are unsure whether, or how to raise a concern and do not feel you can seek advice from Pershore Wellbeing Hub, you can obtain free confidential advice from Protect (020 3117 2520, whistle@protect-advice.org.uk or www.protect-advice.org.uk).

You can also contact the Charity Commission via email at whistleblowing@charitycommission.gov.uk

 

 

Protection and support for whistleblowers

We aim to encourage openness and will support whistleblowers who raise genuine concerns under this policy, even if they turn out to be mistaken.

Whistleblowers must not suffer any detrimental treatment as a result of raising a genuine concern. If you believe that you have suffered any such treatment, you should inform the Chairman immediately. If the matter is not remedied you should raise it formally using our Grievance Procedure.

You must not threaten or retaliate against whistleblowers in any way. If you are involved in such conduct you may be subject to disciplinary action.